Arduino Planet

December 13, 2017

adafruit industries blog

This Is What Happens When You Hack a Casio Watch @travisgoodspeed #WearableWednesday #wearabletech #tech #smartwatch #DIY #hackers

Get ready for the Goodwatch

The master of weird machines @travisgoodspeed has struck again with an amazing hack for a Casio watch, just in time for SchmooCon (FYI tickets are already sold out). As you might guess, the new GoodWatch20 does so much more than the original Casio. The wire on the back of the watch is the hint.

GoodWatch Antenna

If you guessed antenna, then you are correct! According to Travis the watch can receive and transmit everything from CW to 4FSK, which apparently is an upgrade from his previous GoodWatch10. Here’s a post from Twitter with a demo.

The watch uses a TI CC430F6137 microcontroller and has a hex editor, as well as an RPN calculator (for computer science lovers).  There’s also a TI MSP430 disassembler and the firmware has a serial debug monitor. If you want to follow the rest of the breadcrumbs to this amazing watch you should check out the pin on Twitter. Travis will be handing out a few unpopulated boards at SchmooCon and has promised to release the source code and CAD files soon. So, if anyone receives one of these boards, please check in as we would love an update. Note to Travis: thanks again for another mindblowing device for a con. #bloggingu4ever


Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

by Leslie Birch at December 13, 2017 06:00 AM

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017: Feather – Wireless/Radio/BLE/IoT Feathers

Unnamed

This is day 3 of our week of gift guides devoted to the feather! (Check out day 1 and day 2 coverage) Today let us introduce you to Wireless/Radio/BLE and IoT Feathers!


2995 01

Adafruit Feather M0 Bluefruit LE: This is the Adafruit Feather M0 Bluefruit LE – our take on an ‘all-in-one’ Arduino-compatible + Bluetooth Low Energy with built in USB and battery charging. It’s an Adafruit Feather M0 with a BTLE module, ready to rock! We have other boards in the Feather family, check’em out here.

Bluetooth Low Energy is a hot, low-power, 2.4GHz spectrum wireless protocol. In particular, it’s the only wireless protocol that you can use with iOS without needing special certification, and it’s supported by all modern smart phones. This makes it excellent for use in portable projects that will make use of an iOS or Android phone or tablet. It also is supported in Mac OS X and Windows 8+.

Related Guides in the Adafruit Learn System


3027 01

Adafruit Feather 32u4 FONA: This is the Adafruit Feather 32u4 FONA – our take on an ‘all-in-one’ Arduino-compatible + audio/sms/data capable cellular with built in USB and battery charging. Its an Adafruit Feather 32u4 with a FONA800 module, ready to rock!

At the Feather 32u4’s heart is at ATmega32u4 clocked at 8 MHz and at 3.3V logic, a chip setup we’ve had tons of experience with as it’s the same as the Flora. This chip has 32K of flash and 2K of RAM, with built in USB so not only does it have a USB-to-Serial program & debug capability built in with no need for an FTDI-like chip, it can also act like a mouse, keyboard, USB MIDI device, etc.

Since you’ll be taking this on the road, we added a connector for any of our 3.7V Lithium polymer batteries and built in battery charging. A 500mAh+ Lipoly battery is required for use, it keeps the cellular module happy during the high current spikes. Plug the Feather into microUSB to charge at 500mA.

Related Guides in the Adafruit Learn System


3405 10
Adafruit HUZZAH32 – ESP32 Feather Board: Aww yeah, it’s the Feather you have been waiting for! The HUZZAH32 is our ESP32-based Feather, made with the official WROOM32 module. We packed everything you love about Feathers: built in USB-to-Serial converter, automatic bootloader reset, Lithium Ion/Polymer charger, and just about all of the GPIOs brought out so you can use it with any of our Feather Wings.

That module nestled in at the end of this Feather contains a dual-core ESP32 chip, 4 MB of SPI Flash, tuned antenna, and all the passives you need to take advantage of this powerful new processor. The ESP32 has both WiFi and Bluetooth Classic/LE support. That means it’s perfect for just about any wireless or Internet-connected project.

Related Guides in the Adafruit Learn System


3406 00
Adafruit Feather nRF32 Bluefruit LE: The Adafruit Feather nRF52 Bluefruit is another easy-to-use all-in-one Bluetooth Low Energy board, with a native-Bluetooth chip, the nRF52832! It’s our take on an ‘all-in-one’ Arduino-compatible + Bluetooth Low Energy with built in USB and battery charging.

This chip has twice the flash, SRAM and performance of the earlier nRF51-based Bluefruit modules. Best of all, it has Arduino IDE support so there is no ‘helper’ chip like the ATmega32u4 or ATSAMD21. Instead, this chip is programmed directly! It’s got tons of awesome peripherals: plenty of GPIO, analog inputs, PWM, timers, etc. Leaving out the extra microcontroller means the price, complexity and power-usage are all lower/better. It allows you to run code directly on the nRF52832, straight from the Arduino IDE as you would with any other MCU or Arduino compatible device. A single MCU means better performance, lower overall power consumption, and lower production costs if you ever want to design your own hardware based on your Bluefruit nRF52 Feather project!

Related Guides in the Adafruit Learn System


3178 00

Adafruit Feather M0 w/ RFM95 LoRa Radio – 900 MHz: This is the Adafruit Feather M0 RFM95 LoRa Radio (900MHz). We call these RadioFruits, our take on an microcontroller with a “Long Range (LoRa)” packet radio transceiver with built in USB and battery charging. Its an Adafruit Feather M0 with a 900MHz radio module cooked in! Great for making wireless networks that are more flexible than Bluetooth LE and without the high power requirements of WiFi.

This is the 900 MHz radio version, which can be used for either 868MHz or 915MHz transmission/reception – the exact radio frequency is determined when you load the software since it can be tuned around dynamically.

Related Guides in the Adafruit Learn System


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products!

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

by Jessie Mae at December 13, 2017 05:30 AM

Bacteria powered stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric #WearableWednesday

171207114948 1 900x600

Via ScienceDaily:

A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics.

The team, led by Binghamton University Electrical and Computer Science Assistant Professor Seokheun Choi, created an entirely textile-based biobattery that can produce maximum power similar to that produced by his previous paper-based microbial fuel cells.

Additionally, these textile-based biobatteries exhibit stable electricity-generating capability when tested under repeated stretching and twisting cycles.

Compared to traditional batteries and other enzymatic fuel cells, microbial fuel cells can be the most suitable power source for wearable electronics because the whole microbial cells as a biocatalyst provide stable enzymatic reactions and a long lifetime, said Choi.

Sweat generated from the human body can be a potential fuel to support bacterial viability, providing the long-term operation of the microbial fuel cells.

Read more


Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

by Ben at December 13, 2017 05:00 AM

December 12, 2017

Arduino Blog

This DIY machine mixes your favorite three-ingredient cocktail

Do you and your friends have a favorite cocktail? If so—and if it has three ingredients—then this Arduino-based cocktail machine from YouTuber “GreatScott!” may be worth checking out.

The device is capable of mixing three liquids, which in GreatScott’s case consist of vodka, cranberry juice, and grapefruit juice (also known as a Sea Breeze), in a drink size selected via a rotary encoder and LCD screen.

An Arduino Nano provides the brains for this operation, and each component is poured using a series of three peristaltic pumps. Meanwhile, a load cell underneath the glass holder ensures that the correct amount of liquid is dispensed.

The same setup could be used to make different three-ingredient drinks with a little programming work, or it could be expanded into a multi-drink unit with the addition of a few more pumps. You can see it in action below!

by Arduino Team at December 12, 2017 08:50 PM

SparkFun Electronics News

DIY Holiday Projects, Part 2

I’m excited to share my second and final installment of the 2017 DIY Holiday Project Series. Today I have two more ideas to add some spark and fun (get it?) this holiday season - one for Christmas and one for Hanukkah.

This last Christmas project is a Caroling Door Mat, which uses a SparkFun RedBoard, MP3 Player Shield, Hamburger Speaker, DIY soft momentary push button and 10mm red LED. Let’s go into how it works.

Hidden underneath an unassuming door mat is a giant soft momentary push button, which was made using interfacing and conductive fabric. How does that work? Well, I cut a large piece of interfacing slightly smaller than my door mat, and then cut out small circles from the center of the material. Then, I hot glued a stiff piece of non-stretch conductive fabric on either side, which are kept separate by the interfacing. When pressure is applied, the two pieces of fabric will touch through the holes cut into the interfacing, making an electrical connection and acting as a momentary push button.

This soft button is then connected to a RedBoard via hook-up wire. I used long pieces of stranded wire and stripped about 10 inches on one end. Then I used masking tape to secure the exposed wire to the conductive fabric, creating a strong and secure electrical connection. I did that on either side so both pieces of conductive fabric had a wire attached that acted as leads and could easily connect to the rest of my circuit.

A large red LED has also been embedded into the mat on the reindeer’s nose, which is connected to the Redboard. When the momentary pushbutton is pressed (stepped on) the LED lights up and one of seven Christmas songs is triggered by the MP3 Player. When the user steps off the mat, the music stops and the LED turns off.

Our last holiday project is a soft and sewable Hanukkah menorah, or hanukkiah. This hanukkiah lives on an embroidery hoop, and includes nine LilyPad LEDs, nine LilyPad Switches, one LilyPad Simple Power Board, and one Lipo Battery - all connected using conductive thread.

On the front side of the fabric is the hanukkiah shape in blue felt, with yellow felt flames. Hidden behind each felt flame is one LilyPad LED. On the backside of the felt are the switches, battery pack and conductive thread traces. The LEDs are arranged so that all of the cathodes point toward the top of the hoop, and anodes toward the bottom. This kind of uniform arrangement allows for easy circuit sewing.

The negative terminal tab of the battery holder is connected directly to all the LED cathodes, and the positive terminal is connected to one end of all of the switches. The opposite side of each switch is connected to an LED anode. When all switches are turned on, the circuit features 9 LEDs in parallel. Because LiPo batteries are rechargeable, you use a wall charger and plug in to the second terminal on the Simple Power board with a USB Cable and either charge the battery, or simply use it for power. This circuit allows the user to switch the LEDs on one at a time, making it a functional and kid-friendly hanukkiah!

It has been a ton of fun putting together these projects and the process has certainly put me in the holiday spirit. I hope you enjoyed these, and as always please share your thoughts and ideas in the comments below!

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by SparkFun Electronics at December 12, 2017 02:39 PM

December 11, 2017

Arduino Blog

Create a beat by nodding your head

If you are really enjoying a song, you may start to bob your head to the tunes, but what if you could instead create actual music with this subtle movement? That’s exactly what Andrew Lee’s “Nod Bang” system accomplishes.

An accelerometer mounted to a pair of headphones senses nods in order to dictate the beat, while four 3D-printed arcade buttons are used to select which sounds will be played. An Arduino takes these inputs and passes them to a computer via a MIDI USB interface. The board also controls lights on the buttons for visual feedback.

Be sure to check it out in action below and read Lee’s entire write-up here.

by Arduino Team at December 11, 2017 10:40 PM

SparkFun Electronics News

Arduino Comparison Guide

Arduino is a great platform for beginners looking to get into microcontrollers, hobbyists wanting to create an interactive project, and even engineers who want to prototype something quickly. SparkFun sells over 60 boards that can be programmed using the Arduino software. This can make choosing the right board for your application a daunting process. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered: we created a comparison guide that lets you easily look at the specs for the various boards to help you decide:


Arduino Comparison Guide


If you need a more personal touch, I put together a list of my favorite boards and explained why I like to use them for each application. This will hopefully give you a starting point if you’re looking to make something with Arduino.

Do you have any personal favorites? Let us know in the comments which boards you like to use and for what kinds of projects!

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by SparkFun Electronics at December 11, 2017 04:28 PM

uC Hobby

Bad Desk Lamp + 3D Printing = Cool Camera Mount + Useful hand Magnifier

I recently purchased a hot-air gun + soldering iron station from X-Tronic which came with a desk lamp magnifier.  The desk lamp was not functional so I took it apart to fix.  It was made so poorly, I considered it too dangerous to use.  It went on the scrap pile. Today, I decided to make […]

by uCHobby at December 11, 2017 08:02 AM

December 10, 2017

Dangerous Prototypes

App note: Choose the right power supply for your FPGA

an_maxim_an5447

Designing a power supply for FPGA includes multiple voltage, ripple management and power sequencing, here’s an app note from Maxim Integrated. Link here (PDF)

Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and complex programmable logic devices (CPLDs) require 3 to 15, or even more, voltage rails. The logic fabric is usually at the latest process technology node that determines the core supply voltage. Configuration, housekeeping circuitry, various I/Os, serializer/deserializer (SerDes) transceivers, clock managers, and other functions all have differing requirements for voltage rails, sequencing/tracking, and voltage ripple limits. An engineer must consider all of these issues when designing a power supply for an FPGA.

by DP at December 10, 2017 05:00 PM

App note: Current-sense amplifier doubles as a high common mode instrumentation amplifier

an_maxim_an4495

Application note from Maxim intergrated on utilizing a boost converter and a current-sense amplifier to form a regulator that derives +5V from -48V without isolation. Link here (PDF)

Instrumentation amplifiers (IAs) are used where gain accuracy and dc precision are important, such as in measurement and test equipment. The downside of IAs is the cost. However, inexpensive current-sense amplifiers handle high common-mode voltages and share some traits with IAs. As a result, in some applications, such as a ground-referenced -48V to +5V power converter, current-sense amplifiers can replace IAs, thereby reducing cost.

by DP at December 10, 2017 01:00 PM

December 08, 2017

Dangerous Prototypes

Free PCB coupon via Facebook to 2 random commenters

BP

Every Friday we give away some extra PCBs via Facebook. This post was announced on Facebook, and on Monday we’ll send coupon codes to two random commenters. The coupon code usually go to Facebook ‘Other’ Messages Folder . More PCBs via Twitter on Tuesday and the blog every Sunday. Don’t forget there’s free PCBs three times every week:

Some stuff:

  • Yes, we’ll mail it anywhere in the world!
  • We’ll contact you via Facebook with a coupon code for the PCB drawer.
  • Limit one PCB per address per month, please.
  • Like everything else on this site, PCBs are offered without warranty.

We try to stagger free PCB posts so every time zone has a chance to participate, but the best way to see it first is to subscribe to the RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook.

by DP at December 08, 2017 11:53 PM

adafruit industries blog

GEMMA and CircuitPython: Moar guide updates! MOAR!

Adafruit’s new GEMMA M0 wearable microcontroller comes with CircuitPython support fresh from the factory. Plug it into USB and use any text editor to open and edit the “.py” file…it’s just that simple, no IDE to install!

We’re updating most of our “classic” GEMMA guides on the Adafruit Learning System to provide example CircuitPython code for the new board along with the original Arduino sketches, and bringing the latter up-to-date where needed. GEMMA M0 can run either one.

With something like 160 GEMMA-related guides in the Adafruit Learning System, watch for updates in small batches. Here are the latest:


NeoPixel Ring Bangle Bracelet — Wear a bangle of light! Build a charming bracelet from four NeoPixel rings and GEMMA, Adafruit’s tiny wearable electronics platform.


Larson Scanner Shades — A simple cyberpunk/Tronpunk fashion project!


3D Printed NeoPixel Ring Hair Dress — Here’s an elegant wearables project for those really special occasions. A 3D Printed LED Hair Dress, powered by an NeoPixel ring and Gemma, Adafruit’s tiny yet powerful wearables micro-controller.

Logan’s Run Hand Jewel LED — In this guide, you’ll learn how to build a bright glowing light that can be used for cosplay elements, decor and wearables. The circuit and components are fully contained in a 3D printed cylindrical enclosure.

Kaleidoscope Eyes (Trinket-Powered NeoPixel LED Ring Goggles) — Fashion headwear for cyberpunks, steampunks and Daft Punks.

by PhilB at December 08, 2017 11:10 PM

SparkFun Electronics News

Friday Product Post: LilyPalooza!

Welcome, everyone! Thank you for stopping by for another exciting Friday Product Post here at SparkFun. This week we have plenty of brand-new LilyPad products and e-textile accessories to make whatever your heart desires. We are happy to bring you our new ProtoSnap Plus in a kit as well as a Lab Pack, a simple E-Sewing ProtoSnap board and kit for those of you who just want to light up your fabric, and a few other goodies that will help set you up! Let’s jump in!

E-sew your way to a new tomorrow!

LilyPad E-Sewing ProtoSnap

LilyPad E-Sewing ProtoSnap

DEV-14546
$4.95
LilyPad E-Sewing ProtoSnap Kit

LilyPad E-Sewing ProtoSnap Kit

KIT-14528
$9.95

The LilyPad E-Sewing ProtoSnap is a great way to explore how buttons and switches behave in simple e-sewing circuits before crafting your project. Like other LilyPad ProtoSnap series boards, the individual pieces of the board are pre-wired — allowing you to try out the function of the circuit before sewing. There is no programming required to use this ProtoSnap, and it can be used right away!

We have also incorporated this little LilyPad ProtoSnap into an easy-to-use kit with everything you need to start sewing a simple circuit right away!


LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus Kit

LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus Kit

DEV-12922
$49.95
LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus Lab Pack

LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus Lab Pack

LAB-14529
$500.00

The LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus Kit is an all-in-one e-textile prototyping kit that has been specifically designed to make it as easy as possible to incorporate electronics into any of your garments or fabrics. The included LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus is a sewable electronics powerhouse that you can use to explore circuits and programming, then break apart to make an interactive fabric or wearable project. We have also included a USB cable, 110mAh LiPo battery, needle set and two conductive thread bobbins. With all of these parts combined and the featured Activity Guide, you will be able to plan and create fantastic projects in no time!

For our teaching friends, we have also made this kit available in Lab Pack form for classroom and makerspace applications.

New!

LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus Activity Guide

December 7, 2017

Learn how to program in Arduino with the LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus. This guide includes 10 example activities that use the pre-wired LilyPad boards on the LilyPad ProtoSnap Plus.

Make: Wearable Electronics

Make: Wearable Electronics

BOK-14530
$34.95

“Make: Wearable Electronics” is intended for those with an interest in physical computing and creating interfaces or systems that live on the body. Perfect for makers new to wearable tech, this book introduces you to the tools, materials and techniques for creating interactive electronic circuits and embedding them in clothing and other things you can wear.

Each chapter features experiments to get you comfortable with the technology and then invites you to build upon that knowledge with your own projects. Fully illustrated with step-by-step instructions and images of amazing creations made by artists and professional designers, this book offers a concrete understanding of electronic circuits and how you can use them to bring your wearable projects from concept to prototype.


LilyPad Sewable Electronics Kit Guidebook

LilyPad Sewable Electronics Kit Guidebook

BOK-14270
$4.95

The full-color LilyPad Sewable Electronics Kit Guidebook contains step-by-step instructions for creating four interactive projects from the materials contained in the kit. Examples and circuits are provided and explained. The manual also includes a glossary and troubleshooting tips. Once you make your way through all of the projects, you will have a much better grasp on e-textiles!


SparkFun Large Parts Box - LilyPad (Magnetic)

SparkFun Large Parts Box - LilyPad (Magnetic)

TOL-14005
$4.95

When you’re working with e-textiles, you have a tendency to collect a lot of small parts: LilyPad boards, bobbins, needles…the tools of the trade. Why not pick up a sturdy box to keep your bits and pieces off the floor? This large LilyPad-branded box is made from rigid cardboard printed with a fancy tone-on-tone pattern, label space and the LilyPad logo. There are even magnetic closures embedded in the lid.


Alligator Clip with Pigtail (10 Pack)

Alligator Clip with Pigtail (10 Pack)

CAB-14303
$6.95

Last up today is a product that may not look like it fits too well into the LilyPad line but actually does. In fact, it can help you prototype your ProtoSnap Plus through its expansion ports. This is a 10-pack of wires that are pre-terminated with an alligator clip on one end and a hookup pigtail on the other. Alligator clips are a staple item for any workbench or makerspace, and with these cables you will be able to easily incorporate those clips into a breadboard, development platform or anything else to which you would normally be able to attach a hookup wire.


And that’s it, everyone! We had a great time developing all of these new LilyPad boards and kits for you, knowing that they should help you make something amazing! As always, we can’t wait to see what you make with these parts! Shoot us a tweet @sparkfun, or let us know on Instagram or Facebook. We’d love to see what projects you’ve made!

Thanks for stopping by. We’ll see you next week with even more new products!

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by SparkFun Electronics at December 08, 2017 12:30 PM

December 07, 2017

Arduino Blog

Santa’s Shop is an animated storytelling installation

Santa’s Shop is an amazing Christmas display consisting of trains, animated figurines, a rotating tree, and several other interesting holiday-themed gadgets.

The decoration features hundreds of 3D-printed parts and many handmade characters, controlled by 46 servos and a total of 12 Arduino boards. Bringing the installation to life was no small task, requiring over 2,000 hours of labor for creators Mike and Annelle Rigsby.

More details on the project can be found in this write-up. You can also see it in action in the video below, or on display live in the window of the Brightway Insurance Agency in Gainesville, Florida this month.

by Arduino Team at December 07, 2017 02:03 PM

December 06, 2017

NYC Resistor

Learn to Program with p5js Animations on Dec 10th

We’re offering a brand-new intro to programming class on December 10th! Tickets available here.

p5js is an excellent gateway to get up and running with programming fundamentals. In the class we will breifly cover some necessary basics of HTML and Javascript, but will primarily focus on the p5js environment for fun animations and interactivity. By the end of this class you will create your own interactive web page, and will have the tools to continue exploring and learning p5js on your own.

Get your tickets on Eventbrite.

by Bonnie Eisenman at December 06, 2017 05:57 PM

December 05, 2017

NYC Resistor

Our next Arduino class is Dec 16

Want to get started with physical computing? Learn to program an Arduino and interact with the physical world on Saturday, December 16th! In our Intro to Arduino: Sensors and Input/Output class, we’ll cover an introduction to Arduino and learn how to manipulate outputs based on sensor inputs.

Get your tickets on Eventbrite.

by Bonnie Eisenman at December 05, 2017 05:56 PM

December 04, 2017

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories

Callie’s Crown

Callie's Crown

Last year while attending FIRST robotics competitions with the Firebots, I had the privilege of serving as a judge at both the Central Valley Regional and the Sacramento Regional. Judging gives an opportunity to get to know the folks involved in the competition, whether they’re students, mentors, or other volunteers like you. I’ve judged and volunteered at a few events now, and one of the great things to see is the way that the community builds and nurtures itself.

Neopixel Tiara by Callie

One of the students I met in past years, Callie, had graduated from her team, but keeps coming back as a volunteer. Callie was refereeing at both events, and shines brightly as a role model. Literally. She built an LED tiara and programmed it to light in the event colors of red, white, and blue.

Neopixel Tiara by Callie

She let me take a few pictures of it. It is made with Adafruit Flora Neopixels, a Gemma controller and a small LiPo battery.

Callie and her crown

She’s a student at UC Davis, and is a truly wonderful role model for the high school students at the events. While you don’t necessarily need an LED tiara to shine as a role model, Adafruit does have a tutorial so that you can make one, too.

by Lenore Edman at December 04, 2017 05:05 PM

NYC Resistor

More ShopBot Plywood CNC Joinery for Dilettantes

“When all you have is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail,” or so the saying goes. Well, when all you have is a cartoonishly large CNC router, everything starts to look like you should cut it on there, even if a better tool would be, say, a table saw. Fortunately, the ShopBot is pretty much the ultimate multitasker, and this weekend I set about expanding my very slight knowledge of plywood joinery by making a few rabbet joints. I’ve more or less skated by with just box or finger joints for all my projects to date, and while those are extremely useful and strong, they do require filleting the corners of each joint to make them fit correctly, which isn’t always ideal or pretty.

What on earth is a rabbet joint?, I hear you ask. Is that some sort of drug paraphernalia for small fuzzy mammals? Alas, no (although that does sound like an entertaining ShopBot project in its own right.) A rabbet–or a rebate if you’re from Britain–is a groove cut into the edge of a board. Rabbet joints use them to strengthen and straighten what would otherwise be a butt joint, which is simply where the two parts meet without any modification. Rabbet joints are much stronger because they allow any load to be distributed over a greater surface area, and give glue more crevices to get into. I’m particularly interested in a double rabbet because less of the ugly outer edges of the plywood are visible.

Traditionally, rabbets are cut with a table saw and a dado set, and truth be told, that’s a much faster, simpler, and elegant way to go about this. But I set myself a challenge: I wanted to figure out how to do this on a ShopBot, and I also wanted to take Fusion 360’s CAM package for a spin, and this seemed like a simple way to get started.

I began with the simplest starting point: just one part made out of a bit of scrap:

One of the things that I keep tripping over in Fusion is that because you absolutely have to model everything in three dimensions before you cut it, assumptions that you made early on can come back to haunt you. For example, it’s easy to assume that your stock is exactly, say, half an inch thick, but when you measure it with the calipers, it’s 0.469″ or somesuch. That 1/32″ isn’t usually too much of a problem, but if you want everything to fit precisely without any gaps or bits sticking out that you have to account for it. I find it immensely helpful to define a variable that holds the measured thickness of the stock material, and then define everything else in terms of it.

This is especially helpful if you’re designing something speculatively, before you’ve purchased the wood, and then you just need to go back and make this change in one place rather than re-drawing the entire thing from scratch. So in my case, I started with the nominal plywood thickness of 0.5″, defined the rabbet depth to be 1/3 of that, and the rabbet width to be 2/3  on one side and 1/3 on the other.

This first attempt went pretty well. This was my first meaningful attempt at using Fusion 360 as a full-fledged CAM suite in addition to its design capabilities. Things I noticed right off the bat about the resulting toolpaths were:

  • The “adaptive clearance” mode for pocketing out large areas results in a very good surface finish at the expense of a bit more waste stock. Fusion is used most frequently for machining metal, so it makes some sense that the programming is especially well-suited for doing very fine finishing passes.
  • If you want to sacrifice some of the spoilboard to ensure that cuts go completely through the material, the adjustment to make is the “bottom” plane of the cutting operation, not by monkeying with the dimensions of the board or the zero plane, both of which I tried with bad results.
  • If using triangular hold-down tabs, which tend to cut off more easily, be sure to make them long and thick enough to hold up during the final finishing pass if you have one programmed.
  • For pocketing/clearance operations where perfect fit is needed, be sure to uncheck “stock to leave” which is, annoyingly, configured to some random value by default.

My new skill in hand, I set about making something more useful: a simple five-sided box, open at the top.

Once I’d sketched out the parts in Fusion, I set up the CNC operations:

This time, I actually remembered to simulate the whole thing to make sure I’d put in tabs and make sure I had set everything else up properly

 

I was pretty pleased with the surface finish, especially against the sides of the material. I cleaned everything up by hand with a bit of 220-grit sandpaper. Wood, as they say, is a forgiving medium, and sandpaper is the apology.

The moment of truth is the dry-fit to confirm that the design was correct, which it fortunately was.

After glue-up, a quick douse down with a coat of lacquer and it’s…almost presentable.

You can see here what I meant about not seeing too much of the edges of the plywood. Of course, they’re visible on the top–there’s not much to be done about that. But on the sides of the box, only at most 1/3 of the ply side is visible. Even more elegant rabbet joints mitre the edges to hide everything completely. I’d like to try that as a version 2.0.

You can find me on Twitter at @gdickinson.

by Guy Dickinson at December 04, 2017 05:50 AM

December 01, 2017

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories

Using the WaterColorBot to teach programming

Water color painting titled Ocean Woman
JR has been volunteering in a high school programming class and wrote up a thoughtful post about his experiences using the WaterColorBot in the classroom. He wrote a Python library that allows users to directly control a WaterColorBot by writing Python code.

To be honest, this library is a pretty insane way to control the bot. It’s needlessly low-level: you’re manually controlling the brush’s position, you’ve got to remember to wash and re-ink the brush every so often, etc. If your main goal is to just get the bot to paint a pretty picture, there are lots of better ways to go about it.

As a teaching aid, though, it’s been a total success, because it lets students flex their burgeoning Python skills and actually make a real thing in the process! We’ve been blown away by the stuff our students have created.

He has also documented and shared his code on github.

by Lenore Edman at December 01, 2017 07:19 PM

November 28, 2017

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories

Linkdump: November 2017

Vintage Usborne Computing Book Covers

by Windell Oskay at November 28, 2017 05:59 PM

November 24, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – All Things micro:bit

For our final installment of 2017 development board Gift Guides we’re profiling the BBC micro:bit! It’s impossible to not get excited by – and slightly adore – the size and capabilities of the micro:bit. It packs a lot of really useful features into a really interesting form factor. And it really is a wonderful learning tool. We recommend Lesson #0 for simply becoming familiar with this novel board, and when you’re ready for something a bit more challenging check out our Puppet “Text Message” System project. Also be sure to check out our micro:bit category on the blog for all our :bit-related news in one spot!


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.


by nicknormal at November 24, 2017 05:30 AM

November 23, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – Friends of CircuitPython

OK so you’ve worked with our Gemma, Circuit Playground Classic, Trinkets, or Metro boards – mostly because of your past familiarity with the Arduino IDE. But you’ve heard really interesting things about CircuitPython, or MakeCode and the sheer simplicity of coding using drag-and-drop blocks. If only you had some options to dabble between them all, while maintaining consistency with the same form factor you’re accustomed to for your project needs. If only! Welcome to our made-for-CircuitPython line of boards, most of which are also compatible with the Arduino IDE you’re comfortable and familiar with.

That’s right we have flavors of the Gemma, Circuit Playground (Express), Trinket, and Metro all made compatible for use with CircuitPython. “No compiler, linker or IDE required!”


The Circuit Playground Express takes the Classic and ramps it up a notch – including additional sensors, and the previously mentioned CircuitPython and MakeCode support. One of my all-time favorite Circuit Playground projects is this How Tall Is It? project that turns the development board into an inclinometer – for measuring the height of objects from a distance! (This project is also compatible with the Circuit Playground Classic.)
Check it out:


There’s a version of the full-size Metro that carries the ‘M0’ name as well – because at its core is the ATSAMD21G18 chip, an ARM Cortex M0+ processor. To explain all the differences in form and function of this Metro from the ATmega version, check out the Learn Guide Adafruit Metro M0 Express – Designed for CircuitPython.


The Gemma M0 extends our wearables options in ‘express’ territory. Make a classic theremin on a breadboard, hoop earrings, or challenge yourself to learning CircuitPython with our Sheikah Pendant or Clockwork Goggles


Last but not least from the Adafruit family of products, the Trinket M0 brings ARM power to the Trinket form factor! This brings 32x as much flash, 64x as much RAM, and 6x the speed as the ATtiny85-based Trinkets. This lets you perform some pretty amazing feats such as these Charlieplexed LED matrices that you can program some beautiful animations onto using CircuitPython:

Learn more about this project here.


Outside of our own options is the MicroPython pyboard. Read this Learn Guide to learn all about MicroPython specifically – along with our range of MicroPython-compatible Learn Guides for making everything from tachometers to holiday lights, and more!

The pyboard is a compact and powerful electronics development board that runs MicroPython. It connects to your PC over USB, giving you a USB flash drive to save your Python scripts, and a serial Python prompt (a REPL) for instant programming. Requires a micro USB cable, and will work with Windows, Mac and Linux.


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.





by nicknormal at November 23, 2017 05:30 AM

November 22, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – Commute with the Adafruit Metro!

Today we’re profiling our own Metro boards – the full-size and ‘mini’ versions. First up the full-size Metro may look somewhat familiar, at least in terms of form-factor-ness:


 
The size and shape of the Metro is derivative of the Arduino UNO R3, with a few of our own bells and whistles thrown in. Notably those 4 indicator LEDs on the edge of the board between the DC power jack and USB receptacle. Also the device can operate at 3.3V or 5V logic with a simple jumper, and the DC jack even includes a micro on/off switch next to it for easily powering down your project when needed without physically disconnecting the power supply.

The full-size Metro is fully compatible with all our Arduino shields as well. (The version shown above has headers pre-soldered to the board, but we sell a header-less version as well.)

To show what that could possibly translate into, here’s an example from Collin Cunningham upgrading a decades-old 2X-L ‘bot with a Metro, Wave shield, and proto shield to accommodate a LM386 amplifier circuit to give his Echo Dot a new look and feel:


 
Next up is also the Metro, but in Mini form factor!

The Metro Mini comes as a fully assembled and tested board, with bootloader burned in and also a stick of 0.1″ header. Some light soldering is required if you’d like to plug it into a breadboard, or you can solder wires or header directly to the breakout pads. Once headers are installed they can be fitted into 0.6″ wide sockets.

Similar in function but in a different size package is the Metro Mini – at only 18mm x 44mm x 4mm the Mini is truly that, while providing all the power and punch you expect out of the ATmega328 brain. The board can easily be configured for plugging into a breadboard, allowing for rapid prototyping prior to designing your own Metro shield or standalone PCB. The small form factor has a unique look, for example in this Metro Minimalist Clock:


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.


by nicknormal at November 22, 2017 05:30 AM

November 21, 2017

mightyOhm

Place your holiday orders by November 30th!

News flash –

As I mentioned on The Amp Hour, I’ll be traveling abroad for most of December. If you’d like to order a Geiger Counter or HV Rescue Shield, make sure to place your order by next Thursday, November 30th. I’ll update the shipping status page to reflect this.

If you are interested in purchasing a Geiger counter kit and miss the deadline, no worries! You can also purchase one from Adafruit.

Happy Holidays!
Jeff

by Jeff at November 21, 2017 08:50 PM

November 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Biohacking: Learning to See with Sound

There is a software package that has been available since 1992 called “the vOICe“. It allows for sensory substitution creating an audio landscape based on camera images. The primary application for this software is to assist the blind with navigation. However, I can see from a biohacking perspective that “the vOICe” might just fall under the brushing with magic category.  Arthur C. Clarke’s famous quote comes to mind “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”. Yes, seeing people blind folded that can successful find a table, pick up a fork and serve themselves might just seem like magic to on lookers.

Early home-made setup for The vOICE. Smaller cameras, phones and Raspberry Pi support are making things less awkward.

Here is a summary of the Hardware options to start experimenting with “the vOICe” today:

The above image has a WAV file associated with it so you can hear what the sine wave and block shapes sound like.

Learning the navigation queues:

The good news is that there is an excellent manual with step by step exercises such as picking up blocks on a table while blind folded. The bad news is that this process of hearing where things are needs to be done in baby steps. Just picking up brightly colored blocks from a dark table has a recommended two week training period with 30 minutes a day block practice. Full soundscape navigation fluency is expected to take up to a year.

The voice works in a very predictable way “scans the view from left to right, while associating height with pitch and brightness with loudness. Another way of describing the mapping is that each view is scanned in thin vertical slices, starting with a vertical slice sounding on your left side and ending with a vertical slice sounding on your right side.”

Reading through the manual and attempting to navigate my home with the Droid app required I make some adjustments:

  • Lower the volume – the soundscapes being played are intense and even irritating depending on what is in the current frame. Lower volume helps a lot with absorbing the sounds.
  • Practice Blindfolded
  • Move quickly (when safe to do so) or at least naturally. Moving slow is different experience that has too much thinking involved. The goal is to stop analyzing and become fluent.

by Mikey Sklar at November 20, 2017 09:00 PM

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – Flora, Gemma, and Circuit Playground Classic

All this week we’ll be featuring microcontrollers and development boards as part of our ongoing 2017 Gift Guides!

If you’re looking to get someone interested in a wearables-centric Arduino-compatible platform, Flora is a great place to start. The board is currently in version 3 and is compatible with a smörgåsbord of breakout sensors and modules – including GPS, accelerometer, light sensor, and even a UV index sensor, and more! If you’re curious to see more about those sensors check out the video below and accompanying Flora Sensors Learn Guide for more pictures and descriptions. The Flora book pack is currently out of stock but the standalone book is available so you could still build your own Flora ‘book pack’ for that special someone interested in wearables.


If you’re looking for a wearable solution that’s a bit more discreet, or maybe you only need a few (as in 3) GPIOs, look no further than the Gemma, a small but highly capable device (described in detail – both operationally and with example uses – at this Learn Guide). Measuring only 1″ in diameter, the unit is powered by an ATtiny85 with 8K of flash. Power can be delivered via external battery or USB – and it now even has a micro on/off switch (not shown in following video). Check it out:


Breakout Moment!

Okay so you’re interested in the Flora, but the Gemma is just so darn cute! (And you’ve heard fun things about ATtiny85.) But which one is really for you? Thankfully there’s a video for that! Watch:


OK both the Flora and Gemma look very capable. (Because they are!) But maybe you’re looking for something with just a bit more…zazz! Perhaps a light sensor on-board, oh and a microphone would be swell! And what are the chances of having a small board (I like that round form factor too) with an accelerometer, thermistor, and a bevy of NeoPixels already installed for feedback display or just aesthetics? There’s a board for that! And it looks great too:


 
It’s the Circuit Playground Classic and it contains all the sensors and LEDs previously mentioned and even more! Including pushbuttons, a miniature speaker, and capacitive-capable inputs. At 2″ round, this board packs a punch and is even cheaper than a standard Arduino – WOW!

To give you an example of the touch-and-sound capabilities of the Circuit Playground Classic check out this Star Trek combadge; and to see an example of the feedback from NeoPixels check out this electronic D6 dice project (that uses the accelerometer to detect a ‘roll’).


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.



by nicknormal at November 20, 2017 05:30 AM

November 14, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Make Robot Puppy, Not Robot Enemy: Boston Dynamics’ Latest Robot Dog

via The Verge

Robot maker Boston Dynamics, now owned by Japanese telecom and tech giant SoftBank, just published a short YouTube clip featuring a new, more advanced version of its SpotMini robot. SpotMini, first unveiled in June 2016, started out as a giraffe-looking chore bot that was pretty terrible at performing tasks around the house, and, in one short clip, hilariously ate it on a cluster of banana peels like a character straight out of a slapstick cartoon.

The new SpotMini looks much more polished and less grotesque, like a real-life cross between a Pixar animation and a robot out of a Neill Blomkamp vision of the future, thanks in part to series of bright yellow plates covering its legs and body. The new bot’s movement also looks incredibly fluid. It shows just how much progress Boston Dynamics is making on its goal of life-like, animal-inspired robots that can move and respond to the forces in the real world.

See more!

by Zay at November 14, 2017 08:00 AM

October 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Animated ‘Snake Eyes’ Embedded in Day of the Dead Print | #ElectronicHalloween #RaspberryPi #piday

Thanks to educator Kristoffer for sending us images – and video! below – of his snake eyes bonnet with accompanying displays attached to a Raspberry Pi 3, displaying two eyes embedded inside a Day of the Dead print, itself inside a coffin-shaped frame. What a clever way to embed some moving eyes!


Adafruit electronic halloween dark HAPPY HALLOWEEN! Every weekday this month we’ll be bringing you ideas and projects for an Electronic Halloween! Expect wearables, hacks & mods, costumes and more here on the Adafruit blog! Working on a project for Halloween this year? Share it with us on Google+, in the comments below, the Adafruit forums, Facebook, Instagram or Twitter— we’d love to see what you’re up to and share it with the world (tag your posts #ElectronicHalloween). You can also send us a blog tip! Tune in to our live shows, 3D hangouts with Noe and Pedro and Ask an Engineer, featuring store discount codes, ideas for projects, costumes, decorations, and more!

by nicknormal at October 20, 2017 03:18 PM

September 27, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Seen at #MakerFaire: ‘Some Cool Stuff!’ – Specifically a DIY Kaleidoscope – by Randy Sarafan

Instructables Design Studio founder Randy Sarafan had a few projects on display at the recent World Maker Faire. He was showing some of his well-known robotics projects but the one that really caught my eye was his homemade kaleidoscope with a clamping mechanism for holding your cameraphone steady after you position the camera’s lens against the viewing receptacle (shown below) of the kaleidoscope:

A small motor could turn the kaleidoscope, or alternatively you could point it at something which itself is moving (such as images on a screen). The clamping mechanism allows you to record video or take stills of kaleidoscopic images like so:

See more of Randy’s projects here on his website.

by nicknormal at September 27, 2017 11:24 AM

September 13, 2017

one girl's diary of improvisational engineering

Winch Bot – scanlime:026

Finally some locomotion for the flying camera system, it’s a 3D printed 1-dimensional robot that knows how to hang out on a network and pull rope.

Please consider supporting me on Patreon so I can keep making these vids!
https://www.patreon.com/scanlime

Subscribe to YouTube notifications or follow https://twitter.com/scanlimelive for live streaming announcements.

by Micah at September 13, 2017 06:33 AM

August 18, 2017

mightyOhm

Economy shipping is now available for international customers

Starting today I am now offering two shipping options for international customers – expedited and economy shipping.

As some folks are no doubt already aware, USPS Priority Mail International costs have more than doubled in the past few years.

Back in 2009 it cost about $12.95 to ship a USPS small flat rate box overseas. As of this year, the cost to ship that same small flat rate box is now over $30!

I’ve received feedback from several customers that the costs to ship overseas were too high, so I started looking at other options and found that USPS First-Class Package International offers slower delivery times (4-6 weeks) but costs less than half as much as USPS Priority Mail. In fact, the current USPS First-Class Package International rates are pretty close to what I was paying for Priority Mail when I first started selling kits. With this new economy shipping option, I can ship a single kit to Canada for $9.50 and to most of the rest of the world for $13.50.

I hope that the economy option appeals to overseas customers who are willing to wait a bit longer to receive their kit. For folks who are more impatient, I am still offering Expedited shipping (via USPS Priority Mail). For super time-critical orders I can also offer Express shipping on a case by case basis (please contact me before placing your order).

To learn more about my kits or to place an order:
MightyOhm Geiger Counter
AVR HV Rescue Shield

Important note: Regardless of shipping method, VAT taxes, duties, import tariffs, customs fees, etc. are always the responsibility of the buyer.

by Jeff at August 18, 2017 10:10 PM

July 28, 2017

todbot blog

ILOVELAMP: my Supplyframe DesignLab residency project

For four months this year I had a residency at the Supplyframe DesignLab.  I worked on “ILOVELAMP“, a project experimenting with creating lamps with configurable light emitting surfaces using addressable LED strips. Check out the project: https://hackaday.io/project/20121-i-love-lamp

by todbot at July 28, 2017 05:55 PM

July 22, 2017

one girl's diary of improvisational engineering

bigclive’s LED Tree – scanlime:025

Join me in assembling a surprise LED lighting kit from bigclive himself!

Check out his channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/bigclivedotcom

Subscribe to YouTube notifications or follow https://twitter.com/scanlimelive for live streaming announcements. I’m also streaming on Twitch now, at https://twitch.tv/scanlime

Please consider supporting me on Patreon so I can keep making these vids!
https://www.patreon.com/scanlime

by Micah Scott at July 22, 2017 11:55 PM

Boldport Stringy Synthesizer – scanlime:024

Last month’s Boldport Club kit was a collaboration with Madlab to produce this beautiful little guitar synthesizer kit, the Stringy!

You can learn more about the Boldport Club and get your own delighful kits by signing up at http://www.boldport.club/

Please consider supporting me on Patreon so I can keep making these vids!
https://www.patreon.com/scanlime

Subscribe to YouTube notifications or follow https://twitter.com/scanlimelive for live streaming announcements.

by Micah Scott at July 22, 2017 11:44 PM

July 09, 2017

todbot blog

Replacing the battery in a Macbook Pro Retina (late 2013)

I really like the generation previous to the current Macbook Pros. You know the ones. They had all the useful ports like USB-A, HDMI, an SD Card slot, and MagSafe!  And it had a long-lived battery in a thin case. That is my Macbook Pro. And it’s wonderful. But now 3.5 years on, the once [...]

by todbot at July 09, 2017 02:31 AM

May 23, 2017

DorkbotPDX

Monolith Synth

Monolith Synth paul Tue, 2017-05-23 12:06

Over the last several weeks I collaborated with Ben Davis, Darcy Neal and Ross Fish on this Monolith Synth interactive sculpture we took to Tested and Maker Faire.

This was a pretty typical usage scene at Maker Faire:

A post shared by Darcy Neal (@drc3p0) on

This crazy adventure started with Kickstarter reached out to me, only 6 weeks before Maker Faire, looking to showcase 4 successful projects in their booth. They wanted to show "creative tools" and how people used them. So I reached out to a few synthesizer folks I've met and who've used Teensy. They also suggested bringing it to Tested to make a video. So it began...

From the beginning I had a step sequencer using illuminated arcade buttons in mind. So I quickly designed this little I/O expander board and sent it off to OSH Park's Super-Swift service.

The whole project came together over just 4 weeks. Our first meetup was just to discuss what to build, followed a week later by our first build night. By then the I/O expander boards had arrived. We made not the final Monolith, but 3 breadboard prototypes, so the software development side could begin!

Another meetup focused only on software. Almost all the software was developed on these prototype panels.

In this picture you can also see the panel layout sketches on the notepad on the right side, and a blue tape model underneath on the table, which we made to get an idea of the overall size.

Ross and Darcy had synthesis plans that needed a signal-controlled PWM waveform and improvements to the envelope feature, so I worked on improvements to the Teensy Audio Library while they wrote the Arduino sketch code.

The day before our next meetup, I started turning those sketches into a design for the laser cutting. I made this 1/4 scale model of the front and side pieces. At this point, none of the back side or interior ribs (for strength) had been designed, and you can see the model lacks the many holes for screws & brackets which joined everything.

Only 2 weeks before Maker Faire we had an epic 13-hour build day where all the final parts were laser cut and assembled. Here's a photo of Darcy & Ben putting the panels together on my kitchen counter!

All the clear acrylic plastic parts were completely drawn, with all mounting holes, and made that day.

Here's the complete layout of all parts (mk2017_design):

Here's a large high-res copy of this image, and a big ZIP file with all the original Corel Draw files for anyone who wishes to try making their own.

While the laser did most fabrication work, other steps like countersinking for the potentiometers were needed. It was indeed an epic 13 hour day of making.

A couple days later, I spent a whole day completing the wiring we couldn't get done in those 13 hours. Erin Murphy (the "Soldering Goddess" at PJRC) put in a few hours on aesthetic improvements to the messy tangle of wires from so many buttons.

Just a few days later we had our last "build" session, to get the 3 separately written Arduino sketches merged and working together as one integrated project. Even though everything has been designed to go together, this session went very late. Ben did much of the heavy lifting to merge the 3 programs.

This is the final audio DSP system settled upon that late night.

Here's a large high-res copy of this image.

This was the first actual usage of the Monolith, well past 1am when we finally had it all up and running.

The next day I took it all apart and packed all the pieces and spare parts into these 2 big boxes, weighing in at 55 and 40 pounds!

This is the first time I've ever shipped a project to Maker Faire, rather than driving a truck or hauling cases of checked baggage on a plane. So much easier, and it allowed time to work on a nice handout card. After some back and forth with the others and last-minute proof reading by Robin, who caught what would have been embarrassing typos and grammatical errors, we sent this card off to be fast-turn printed.


Here is a printable PDF file for the front side.


Here is a printable PDF file for the back side.

Darcy and I flew to San Francisco early and spent the day with Tested, putting it back together while they shot that awesome video. Sometime I hope to have even 1/10th that sort of video production skill.

Since it was already put together, we had little to do setup-wise. Friday morning Ben, Ross and Darcy did some adjustments of the sound levels which really made it come to life in the space. For anyone who wishes to dig deeper into the technical details, thecomplete source code is available on Github.

All weekend long people really enjoyed playing with it. There were many really awesome moments, like this one:

Here is Kickstarter's coverage of the event. Scroll down a bit to the part about Teensy. :)

During the 3 days of Maker Faire, things went very well. We did experience a couple minor issues. Massive electrical noise from so many other projects played havoc with the capacitive touch sensing. Saturday evening I rewrote the code to look for changes from an average rather than just an increase from a threshold, which allowed it to usually work well enough. The other tech issue was a bass. When turned up louder, the bass notes would shake all the plastic panels, rattling screws and even some of the connectors loose at time. Easy to fix.

Towards the end of Sunday, the Maker Faire folks came around and gave up an award. At first I shrugged it off, since they've done the same for other stuff I've brought in prior years. But those were the blue ribbons. Apparently the only hand out one of these red one each in "zone". They said it's a big deal...

Really, the best thing about this year was working with a great team. Ross, Darcy and Ben really stepped up and did a great job on so many parts.

by paul at May 23, 2017 06:06 PM

May 22, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Circuit Playground Bike Glove Light and Custom FLORA PCB with Compass

Thanks Lim for participating in last week’s Show-and-Tell and also for sending in these higher resolution stills and video showing off his projects!

Here’s a video showing the shake-n-glow activation of the bike glove – one shake to turn it on, another to switch off the LEDs:

Very cool!

And here’s a close-up of Lim’s custom FLORA-based PCB with compass in lieu of the WS2812 LED:

Here’s Lim’s original broadcast on last week’s Show-and-Tell:


Featured Adafruit Products!

NewImage

Circuit Playground – Developer Edition: Circuit Playground features an ATmega32u4 processor, just like our popular Flora. The board’s also round and has alligator-clip pads around it so you don’t have to solder or sew to make it work. You can power it from USB, a AAA battery pack, or with a Lipoly battery (for advanced users). Just program your code into the board then take it on the go! Read more.

NewImage

FLORA – Wearable electronic platform: Arduino-compatible – v3: FLORA is Adafruit’s fully-featured wearable electronics platform. It’s a round, sewable, Arduino-compatible microcontroller designed to empower amazing wearables projects.FLORA comes with Adafruit’s support, tutorials and projects. Check out dozens of FLORA tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System, with more added all the time! Read more.

by nicknormal at May 22, 2017 05:37 PM

May 08, 2017

DorkbotPDX

DOBOHEBOCON RESULTS

DOBOHEBOCON RESULTS skinny Mon, 2017-05-08 14:56

The first DorkbotPDX Hebocon had some fierce competitors.  Check below for video and results!

DorkbotPDX DOBOHEBOCON 2017 from Brian Richardson on Vimeo.

Results:

Champion: Popcorn by Gary and Daniel

Gary and Daniel

Their bot has an actual piece of Popcorn in it.

Popcorn in bot!

Technically Poorest: Spring Thing by Drew

Spring Thing

This might be my favorite.  No electricity, just a spring.  

Fastest Fail: Lithium by Bill

Lithium

Lithium was a pro looking bot!

Poorest Quality: Spitter Bot by Mathew

Spitter Bot

Spitter Bot spit 3d printing filament at its foes!

Loudest: Just One Bugfix by Brian

Just One Bugfix

Just One Bugfix played an intimidating scream as it competed.

by skinny at May 08, 2017 08:56 PM

April 19, 2017

DorkbotPDX

DOBOHEBOCON

DOBOHEBOCON skinny Tue, 2017-04-18 21:41

Working rules link here

by skinny at April 19, 2017 03:41 AM

April 17, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Pictures from the 10th Anniversary ‘OptoSonic Tea’ in NYC

Last week marked the 10th anniversary (wow has it really been 10 years – yes, yes it has) in NYC for OptoSonic Tea – think tea, like steeped, or immersion in, with opto like ocular and sonic like aural envelopes of experience (that said at non-anniversary events conversations usually take place around servings of green tea). Projections and light-based works were more obvious: this image is coming from that lens, with mixing or multi-layered visuals being common. Audio was immersive, and random; speakers were scattered throughout the multi-thousand square foot Pioneer Works in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and sometimes (if not most times) the person you could closest find doing audio mixing wasn’t producing the sounds you were necessarily hearing at any moment. Their sound might be elsewhere, or even delayed.

More than three dozen artists and makers participated, and here are some shots from the celebratory evening:


The main hall of Pioneer Works



Co-organizer Katherine Liberovskaya tends to her mixing station; projection seen above on the architecture of the space.




These rad projectors are housed in unique flip-lid cases; the maker was using analog 35mm slides mixed through some digital software (seen above).


Great sounds from this homemade slide guitar instrument – give a listen:


Old school! The heat coming off this bellows-based projector was intense!



This guy had some sort of kaleidoscopic laser gun – seen on the wall. His left hand went into some sort of ‘pouch’ that somehow controlled elements of the projection:


Stay Puft everyone!


Also here’s a nice timelapse of the work by Chris Jordan that I managed to not get a photo of. However this video shows the work even better than I could have documented and also timelapses the amazing effort artists put into their installations:


And here’s the complete list of participating artists from the OptoSonic Tea: 10th Anniversary event:

Gill Arno
Miah Artola
Bob Bellerue
Causings
CHIKA
Tom Chiu
Seth Cluett
Thomas Dexter
Jeff Donaldson
Luke DuBois
Bradley Eros
Michael Evans
David First
Kit Fitzgerald
Richard Garet
Shelley Hirsch
Chris Jordan
Antonia Kuo
Andrew Lampert
Katherine Liberovskaya
Al Margolis
Anthony Martin
Miya Masaoka
Brock Monroe
Charlie Morrow
Dafna Naphtali
Bradford Reed
Ursula Scherrer
Joel Schlemowitz
Lary 7
Lily Sheng
Jeremy Slater
George Stadnik
Hans Tammen
Ben Vida
Stephen Vitiello
Philip White
Amnon Slater
Sonia Yuditskaya

by nicknormal at April 17, 2017 05:37 PM

April 13, 2017

adafruit industries blog

‘Bionic Handling Assistant’ by Festo Inspired by Nature | @roboweek #NationalRoboticsWeek #RoboWeek

Festo have been working on some 21st century production robot arms, inspired by nature. Specifically elephant trunks, and fish tail fins. Festo have additional information, videos, and photos of the unit here on their website, and you can watch the video below here on PBS Learning Media where David Pogue gets a unique look at the labs working on this new tech.


 

Learn how one company took inspiration from nature to reinvent the robotic arm in this video excerpted from NOVA: “Making Stuff Wilder.” Host and technology columnist David Pogue meets with engineer Heinrich Frontzek to find out about the Bionic Handling Assistant—a machine modeled after an elephant’s trunk. A traditional robotic arm is rigid and unable to work closely with humans, but this new design is more flexible and less dangerous. The company has also developed a new kind of adaptive gripper, inspired by fish fins, that is flexible and able to securely grasp even fragile objects, like eggs.

Read more here and here.

by nicknormal at April 13, 2017 04:30 AM

March 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

NEW GUIDE: Toy Car Speed Timer #AdafruitLearningSystem #3DPrinting

Find out how fast your toy car is.

Use two pairs of IR break beam sensors and some 3D-printing skill to build a Toy Car Speed Timer block to adjoin to your 1/64 scale toy race car track! A Feather M0 Basic calculates the difference in time between the two breaks in the pairs of IR sensors and displays the value on an OLED display. The unit is battery powered so it can be switched on and off quickly without running a main power line to the circuit for use in your track design.

See the full guide here!


 
Here’s a sample of the code:

See the full guide here!

by nicknormal at March 20, 2017 06:29 PM

March 03, 2017

Arduino Blog

Need desk lighting? How about 1,200+ LEDs?

After he’d just finished a project using RGB LEDs, Imgur user nolobot’s brother mentioned he needed a new computer desk. Most people would probably just let their brother buy one, others would make something out of wood, but nolobot instead decided to create something truly amazing using more than 1,200 WS2812 RGB LED modules, an Arduino Mega, aluminum extrusion, and translucent polycarbonate.

The Mega controls these LEDs with the FastLED library, which are sandwiched between a base piece of plywood and a strip of polycarbonate using custom spacers. This diffuses the light nicely, allowing for beautiful light animations directly on the desk’s surface.

You can find more on this awesome build on the project’s Imgur page!

by Arduino Team at March 03, 2017 04:33 PM

February 24, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Demo for Slung Load Controller Using #RaspberryPi + naze32 | #piday

After showing what is possible with drone position controlling, Aldo Vargas is back with another drone project, demonstrating compensation for underslung loads. Think of Chinook helicopters transporting Humvees or helicopters carrying sand or water for dousing forest fires. Those maneuvers come with great degree of skill, and learning – operated by humans with years of training, performing moves not typical for commercial drone applications. Which is only to say someone then will figure it out, for drones! The comparison photos, GIF, and video below show what is possible with this controller software.

Multirotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (MRUAV) have become an increasingly interesting area of study in the past decade, becoming tools that allow for positive changes in today’s world. Not having an on-board pilot means that the MRUAV must contain advanced on- board autonomous capabilities and operate with varying degrees of autonomy. One of the most common applications for this type of aircraft is the transport of goods. Such applications require low-altitude flights with hovering and vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capabilities.

Similar as before in this project we use the AltaX Flight Stack which is compromised by a Raspberry Pi 3 as companion computer and a naze32 as flight controller.

The slung load controller and the machine learning estimator is running on the RPI3, although of course the training of the recurrent neural network was done offline in a big desktop computer. The RPI calculates the next vehicle position based on the estimation of the position of the slung load, everything is running using our framework DronePilot and guess what? its open source ;). Keep reading for more details.

The results? Pretty remarkable. Here’s a side-by-side comparison of an underslung loaded drone without and with the controller running:

And here are timelapse photos showing the drone without the load controller:

And here’s that same load while compensated using the load controller:

Wow! That is a difference!

Vargas walks through the setup in the video below, and you can read a bit more here on his blog:


 
Read more.

by nicknormal at February 24, 2017 02:37 PM

February 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

‘Variant: Limits’ is Like Myst for Calculus Students – Explore a 3D World, Solve Puzzles with Calculus! | @Triseum

This. Looks. Amazing!

Triseum have announced a “third-person exploration game based on calculus” called Variant. While the gameplay is clearly different from Myst (3rd person perspective, rotational 3D world), the trailer (below) does remind me of moments from that breakthrough game, solving puzzles to advance through a curious world – how did this architecture get here? Who built this place? Who maintains these grounds? And yeah, you get to learn calculus along the way!

 
Watch the complete trailer:

Triseum are accepting applications from “selected institutions and educators” for “a sponsored pilot in spring 2017 to bring the ultimate in game-based learning experiences to your calculus students.” If you’re interested you can read more and apply for the pilot here – and I do hope this gets released to the general public, and I’m sure I’m not the only one interested in re-learning calculus knowledge through immersive gameplay!

by nicknormal at February 20, 2017 02:11 PM

February 07, 2017

todbot blog

Learning Fusion 360 via 3d-printed iPhone tripod mounts

Here’s how I taught myself Fusion360 by updating a 3d-printable iPhone tripod mount I found on Thingiverse, and put the update back on Thingiverse. Several years ago, I needed a tripod mount for my iPhone, so like anyone with a 3d printer at the time, I headed to Thingiverse and found this awesome tripod mount [...]

by todbot at February 07, 2017 11:58 PM

January 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Little Tike Cozy Coupe Upgraded with Arduino Uno, Wave Shield for Custom Sound Interactions

Brentmore Labs took to upgrading his BMW-hooded Little Tike Cozy Coupe with some custom electronics, adding sound effects and replacing some elements along the way and even doing some custom 3D-printing where replacing plastic parts was required. In short, AMAZING! Check out the video below to hear one of the sound effects, and read more about – including looking at the code running this project – here.

The Little Tike Cozy Coupe, a children’s classic made of soft hollow plastic (LPDE), is a blank canvas for tinkering and customization. While the car comes with some entertainment options, such a squeaker in the horn, I think that my client deserves something a little more realistic and, of course, high-tech.

This wasn’t a particularly difficult project, but it did take a bit of time to set up. The overall concept is to create a media controller which plays different sounds depending on the button pressed. I figured I could replace the toy key with a giant button and also fill the blank space on the left with some buttons to select the music.


 
Read more here.


Featured Adafruit Products!

NewImage

Rugged Metal Pushbutton with Blue LED Ring – 16mm Blue Momentary: These chrome-plated metal buttons are rugged and look real good while doing it! Simply drill a 16mm hole into any material up to 1/2″ thick and you can fit these in place, there’s even a rubber gasket to keep water out of the enclosure. On the front of the button is a flat metal actuator, surrounded by a blue plastic LED ring. Read more.

by nicknormal at January 20, 2017 02:11 PM

January 12, 2017

SparkFun Electronics News

Enginursday: Voltage Regulator Temperature Mobile App

When a design needs an inexpensive, simple and low-ripple voltage supply, a great choice is a linear regulator. These benefits come mostly at the cost of efficiency, which is lost in the form of heat. How does one know if a simple linear regulator can safely operate in a system, how much power is wasted, or how much heat needs to be managed? We’ve created a simple tool that calculates this information for you.

Model of a Linear Voltage Regulator

High level model of linear regulator

Figure 1: High-level model of linear regulator

Figure 1 shows a high-level model of a linear regulator. It consists of a resistive pass element that is controlled by some logic to keep the output voltage at the desired value. At this level only three values are really needed to feed the model and get values for power lost and heat generated: the input supply voltage, the desired output voltage and the current being drawn by the load. That’s all that is required to determine values to necessary precision.

In reality, the pass element isn’t normally a potentiometer as shown, and the control logic is more than a magic box.

More Detailed Conceptual Model

Figure 2: More detailed conceptual model (Courtesy of Linear Technology)

A possible actual implementation uses an error amplifier to sense the output voltage of a voltage divider. The error is the difference between the scaled voltage and a precision reference. The error feeds the base of a bipolar or gate of a field effect transistor in their linear regions. The current through the divider and into the amplifier is known and can be accounted for.

The model used by this application assumes that the power used by the control logic is negligible. In reality, I’ve seen values as low as 1.5µA. Other regulators use on the order of 10’s of µAs. A low quiescent current of 10µA is only 1 percent error when drawing a single mA. Typical use cases are often in the multiple mA range and up. Since the power used by the logic is negligible, the current in is equal to the current out and only needs to be set once. The extra voltage is lost in the form of heat in the power transistor.

Regulator Specifications

The app comes with some typical values for a generic linear regulator already set. This is great for playing around and estimating, but for real applications the actual manufacturer specifications should be used. These may be tricky to find, but the best place to look is in the manufacturer’s datasheet for the part.

Example regulator specifications

Figure 3: Example regulator specifications from datasheet (Courtesy of Maxim Integrated)

The key specs to look for are the maximum junction temperature and the thermal resistance. The resistance varies from package to package and the thermal mass of whatever the regulator is touching. For this example we will take a common use case of a regulator without forced cooling and without a heat sink attached to a four-layer PCB. The datasheet shows this thermal resistance (θJA) between the junction to ambient to be 42°CW.

There are at least three values listed for maximum temperature. The part is rated to operate over the -40°C to +125°C automotive temperature range. That’s not relevant to this math. The maximum junction temperature is spec’d to be +150°C. We can verify that this is a good value since later in the datasheet it is stated that the device will go into thermal shutdown at +165°C. That’s a state to definitely avoid, so there is a little margin.

Using the Application

Example regulator specifications set

Figure 4: Setting example specs

Maximum current allowed example

Figure 5: Determining maximum current allowed

At the top of the app is the familiar hamburger menu that slides the settings out from the left side. Figure 4 shows the thermal resistance of 42°CW and the max junction temperature of +150°C entered. This example uses the default ambient temperature of +25°C. Swiping the settings back to the left hides them. The input voltage was arbitrarily chosen to be 12V, and the output to be 5V. The current slider was wiggled until it was right around the point where JUNCTION TEMP: XY.Z°C label turned red (@ 150°C) and fine-tuned with the steppers to the maximum point where the label wasn’t red. This turns out to be 0.425A, which is wasting nearly 3W of power.

Tips

If you live in ‘Murica you are probably more comfortable with temperature units of degrees Fahrenheit. There is a setting to change the units to °F. Touch the gray Fahrenheit (°F) label. It should turn green, indicating the change has been made. Only the thermal resistance will remain in the units most of the world use (°CW) since we aren’t sure where to find those values in other units (°F·sft·lbf?).

The default ranges of the sliders cover a fairly large range that should work for many cases. If the parameters for a project are outside of these ranges, then the bottom section of the settings is provided as a way to fix that. There might be cases where one wants a clean 200A supply of 24V. Feeding up to ~24.021739V into a magic LDO, that range can be set. Many designs may lie in a narrow range. The parameter ranges can be tightened up to make finer tuning easier. The range of the slider is discretized because there are only so many pixels on a screen. If a value cannot be set with the slider, narrow the range or use the steppers next to the sliders to fine-tune the value.

For back-of-the-envelope type calculations, wiggle the slider near the desired value. If nothing turns red, then the application is nice and safe.

Advanced Use and Hacks

The first hack allows typing in the desired voltages and/or current to great precision. The trick is to set the desired value as the min or max for a slider setting. After that, simply swipe all the way to that extreme, and the exact value is set.

Example regulator specifications set

Figure 6: Setting exact values as slider extremes

Maximum current allowed example

Figure 7: Using those typed-in values

The precision of the inputs on the UI is limited to 10mV and 1mA steps, but the math isn’t. To come up with eight significant digits in the last section, a minute or two was spent using this hack to get that value (which is likely poor using only a simple linear model with the used assumptions).

alt text

Figure 8: Excessive precision

Another ‘hack’ is too use ‘fake’ values for the thermal resistance to model heat sinks and other configurations. Sum the thermal resistances of the regulator, the junction between it and a heat sink, and that of the heat sink.

Where to Score

Want your own copy? It’s free in the Google Play Store and the iTunes App Store.

Hate something about the app? Go fork yourself a copy and change it!

Have an idea for another app? No promises, but feel free to share your idea in the comments below.

Bonus

For those who have never put a mobile app into one of the marketplaces, here is an interesting clip. The following is Google’s automated testing getting an older build to crash. Interesting use of the app, but it worked to find a flaw! Both Apple and Google run tests like these when a new version is uploaded.

Fun clip of Android version crashing during development

comments | comment feed

by SparkFun Electronics at January 12, 2017 03:30 PM

December 18, 2016

uC Hobby

AA Battery Pack to 3.3V for IoT Projects

I tweeted about my experiments with the AAT1217 switching supply controller a few days ago.  I found the chip in a product design I was evaluating. It looked like a great answer to the power problem in an IoT project I’m working on.  I ordered a few from Mouser and some breakout boards to try.  […]

by uCHobby at December 18, 2016 12:32 AM

December 08, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2016: BeagleBone Black Products & Projects

unnamed

The BeagleBone Black is a lil’ Linux-powered single-board computer whose curved corners allow it to fit snugly inside a mint tin 😉 The ‘Bone has a capable array of GPIOs, PWMs, analog inputs, along with I2C, SPI, and the highly-reliable low-latency PRUs (Programmable Real-time Units, powered by two 32-bit 200MHz built-in microcontrollers!), among other features and capabilities. Below we’ve rounded up everything from getting started with to peripherals to some projects that use the ‘Bone:


The Essentials

5V 2A (2000mA) switching power supply – UL Listed

276-00

OK first things first and with the BeagleBone Black that means a dedicated power supply. This wall wart supply of 2000mAh is sufficient if not ideal. Long-story short you don’t want to power the BeagleBone Black over USB if you plan on conducting any WiFi activity (see adapter, below) or driving any project where the power draw might spike. Get a good power supply, and you’ll be good too! This wart is relatively small for the punch it packs with plugs in the orientation I prefer for most of my project installs.


USB WiFi (802.11b/g/n) Module with Antenna

1030-03

Not as discreet as other WiFi modules on the market – but personally I dig the articulating antenna that I can somewhat point in the optimal direction (and yes things like this do actually matter, like, a lot) for my installation.


From Prototype to Project

Adafruit Proto Plate for Beagle Bone & Beagle Bone Black

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For any board, you’ll likely want to begin with a breadboard setup, and proto plates are not only a great way to house a breadboard alongside whatever board you’re working with but allow easy pickup-and-go transport of the prototyping to any new location.


Adafruit Proto Cape Kit for Beagle Bone & Beagle Bone Black

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When you’re ready to make your prototyping layout a little more permanent – and perhaps reclaim your breadboard – consider migrating everything to this Beagle Bone Proto. It doesn’t contain as much prototyping real estate as a breadboard, and will require a nominal amount of soldering, but it looks great and will make nice and tidy your custom through-hole component circuit for your BeagleBone Black.


Anidees BeagleBoneBlack Case – Silver Aluminum with Crystal Top

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And when you’re ready to go full-enclosure, for install either at your workstation or in an environment where the ‘Bone can be placed and left alone, this aluminum-finished enclosure looks fantastic. There’s room inside to house your Beagle Bone Proto as well – although not necessarily the components on top, that all depends on your design and layout. The clear top allows easy viewing of the board or any display or indicator LEDs you might have installed.

And of course if you like this sleek case but want it a bit more stealth-looking, check out this black version. 😉


Projects

Blinking an LED with BeagleBone Black

‘LED blink’ is basically the ‘hello world‘ of any single-board computer project – and this 15-minute project will have you going ‘Aha!’ when you’re done with how easy and intuitive the ‘Bone can be. After this you’ll no doubt want to explore other simple how-tos like measuring temperature or measuring light values – then you’ll be ready for more sophisticated motor control or capsense projects.


LedGames – a BeagleBone Black 64×64 LED Game

Not exactly a simple project, this build will test your fabrication, soldering, and software skillz. But the result is a fantastic-looking 64×64 retro gaming station LedGames!


Dirty Dish Detector

 
My own little claim to fame is this ‘Bone- and OpenCV-powered project I built alongside Jason Kridner called the Dirty Dish Detector. The hardware is relatively plug-n-play, however it will involve some navigation of the command line, as well as Cloud9 which is a brilliant built-in cloud development solution for ‘Bone builds!

Does your makerspace have a sink that is always full of dirty dishes? Or do you yourself require better discipline around the home to stay on top of your chores? To automate your home, office, or workshop, one of the first things you’ll require is some kind of vision system to detect motion or objects. A small computer capable of running OpenCV could be just the tool you need.

The Dirty Dish Detector combines a BeagleBone Black & Logitech webcam – along with plenty of open-source software – to tackle the annoying activity of tracking when dishes get left in the sink.


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit, and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Stay tuned into the blog where you will find new, handpicked gift guides five days a week from November 7 through December 23rd, 2016 alongside holiday themed tutorials and builds!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of November 21st, 2016 1:00 PM ET we are currently offering:

ONE FREE LIMITED EDITION ENAMEL PIN for orders $99 or more. Some restrictions apply. There are currently three unique pins available as free items. While we cannot control which pin you’ll receive with your order, if you order using your Adafruit account we’ll send you a pin you haven’t gotten yet. Once you collect them all, we might have to send you repeats. Each pin is limited edition – so once we’ve given them all away, we won’t have any more. Act fast to collect them all!

ONE FREE ADAFRUIT FEATHER 32U4 BASIC PRO for orders $150 or more. Some restrictions apply and while supplies last!

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Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2016

Here are your 2016 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control.

Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for UPS or USPS.

Sunday, Dec. 25, 2016, Christmas, no UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

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Gift Certificates are always available at any time.

When in doubt contact us!

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UPS ground: Place orders by Friday 11am ET – December 9, 2016 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 23.

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UPS 2-day: Place orders by Friday 11am ET – December 16, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016.

UPS overnight: Place orders by Monday 11am ET – December 19, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016.

United States Postal Service, First Class and Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 9, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First class mail international: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2016. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/23/2016 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/23/2016.

USPS Express mail international: Place orders by Friday – December 2, 2016. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/23/2016 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11am ET – December 9, 2016 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 23 2016.

by nicknormal at December 08, 2016 05:30 AM

November 07, 2016

adafruit industries blog

‘Zooids’ are Open-Source, Open-Hardware ‘Bots for ‘Swarm User Interfaces’

I admit, they’re cute. But I can’t help but think this is the beginning of the creation of those swarm bots that derail the path of Destiny in Stargate: Universe; I’m strictly talking in parallel-universe dimensionality of course, because we all know those drone-bots are not currently anywhere near our solar system – let’s keep it that way okay!

This paper introduces swarm user interfaces, a new class of human-computer interfaces comprised of many autonomous robots that handle both display and interaction. We describe the design of Zooids, an open-source open-hardware platform for developing tabletop swarm interfaces. The platform consists of a collection of custom-designed wheeled micro robots each 2.6 cm in diameter, a radio base-station, a high-speed DLP structured light projector for optical tracking, and a software framework for application development and control. We illustrate the potential of tabletop swarm user interfaces through a set of application scenarios developed with Zooids, and discuss general design considerations unique to swarm user interfaces.

by nicknormal at November 07, 2016 04:29 PM

October 28, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Father Turns Son into a Transforming Optimus Prime

It’s apparently the year for especially fantastic homemade Halloween costumes. We’ve seen one parent craft a cute and furry tauntaun costume for their toddler, and now Redditor Renz2LK has made an Optimus Prime costume for his son. It’s not just any Optimus Prime cosplay — it actually transforms. I’m mesmerized by the above video.

Renz2LK spend about six hours over two days crafting the Optimus Prime costume. He used scrap EVA foam from his workshop to build the vehicle shell. He painted it using spray paint and added acrylics for weathering. Regarding using EVA foam, he said:

As for my son’s costume, it was basic geometric shapes, so it was pretty easy to just custom size each piece to fit him. As for the transforming part, I had seen him pretending to transform while playing in costume. I just created the cab portion of the truck to cover him and found that it was easy to flip it open when he stood up.

And another look at the transforming action:

via Reddit

by Amy Ratcliffe at October 28, 2016 01:00 PM

October 04, 2016

adafruit industries blog

‘The Jolly Julep,’ Handmade and Hand-Powered Paddle Boat #WMF16

‘The Jolly Julep’ was a fun handmade paddle boat designed by The Fulton Mules, on display at World Maker Faire this past weekend. It uses a simple slide mechanism to translate human push-power into spinning paddle speed (see video below!). And as things go in NYC you can’t exactly park this in your apartment (some apartments are smaller than this boat!), so the whole thing was designed to quickly break down and re-assemble; the team built it the day before in a few hours (in the rain no less!). The boat was a recent participant at the Battle for Mau Mau Island, itself a project of some of the Swimming Cities crew, who I wrangled many years ago to display their fish-boat at the inaugural 2010 World Maker Faire – so it was good to see boat culture alive and well at a Maker Faire!

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The wooden fin-waves on the side were a nice touch!

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Watch it in action – play the video below! (Now of course air is a lot less resistant than water, but this shows you how fast this thing can go with human-powered effort!)

by nicknormal at October 04, 2016 07:31 PM

‘MindTIME’ will Make You Question Your Perception of the Passage of Time #WMF16

‘MindTIME V2’ was a fun interactive sculpture made by Kritwalee Seneetantikul, seen at World Maker Faire this past weekend. Consisting of three panels of multiple spinning dials, users would initiate their spinning by touching a conductive pad on the table; the stepper motor-controlled dials would then spin for an unknown amount of time. The challenge to the user was to guess how long the dials spun. Do more dials make more time appear to go by? Do fewer dials slow down our perception of time when in fact more goes by? Users could fill out a survey card of sorts, then compare their answer/s.

The frames were really well designed and the stepper motors mounted nicely on the back:

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MindTime is a series of interactive sculptures that encourage participants to explore their own perception of time. The installation consists of three sculpture sets, each running a different speed. The visitor is encouraged to concentrate on each sculpture and predict how much time has passed. This is analogous to our own lives where time passes too quickly when there are many tasks to complete but moves too slowly when we are waiting for something or seemingly have nothing to do. The experience for each visitor will vary, being either fast or slow according to the way the individual perceives time. I invite visitors to share their results in this paper and compare their different time perception experiences with each other.

Read more.


Featured Adafruit Products!

NewImage

Adafruit Motor/Stepper/Servo Shield for Arduino v2 Kit – v2.3: The original Adafruit Motorshield kit is one of our most beloved kits, which is why we decided to make something even better. We have upgraded the shield kit to make the bestest, easiest way to drive DC and Stepper motors. This shield will make quick work of your next robotics project! We kept the ability to drive up to 4 DC motors or 2 stepper motors, but added many improvements: Read more.

by nicknormal at October 04, 2016 04:11 PM

October 02, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Seen at World #MakerFaire: Play ‘Currency,’ a Bitcoin-Based ASCII Game Hacked into a Burroughs Adding Machine

A game that constantly fluctuates with the current market value of Bitcoin – thus the ethernet shield attached to the Arduino core, constantly checking the value of the cryptocurrency:

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This kid was not only really into the game – obviously! – but went on to win it with about 30 more lever pulls!


 
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With the rise in prominence of the crypto-currency Bitcoin financial markets and governments are scrambling to see how to adjust to this new insurgent monetary form. As an insurgent, Bitcoin becomes the foil in an ASCII generated 8 BIT game who’s controller is a hacked Burrough’s adding machine with receipt printer as the play field. Mirroring the mechanics of 8 BIT Atari games like Defenders or Caverns of Mars the game scrapes data off a Bitcoin trading site to control speed and difficulty of game play. Players attempt to pull the two columns of ASCII symbols together while either being aided or impeded by the current exchange rate of Bitcoins to U.S. Dollars. Because of the twenty four hour nature of this unofficial market each time a player enters the game world scraped data will be different making for new game play, changes may be subtle minute to minute or drastic depending on the fluctuation that day. The Burroughs machine with its intricate mechanisms give the player a tactile portal into the complex systems that control the movement of Bitcoin’s through the web. The printed field, referencing ticker tape of the early stock exchange, this also give the player a record of their game play allowing them to collect and share their success or failures. Players navigate and are faced with the complicated quandaries and pitfalls that come with an unregulated non-central monetary system and the obvious questions this kind of economic system raises. The risk reward of competing in this volatile market is reflected in the risk reward of the game where players can see if luck will be on their side.


 
This project is located on the mezzanine inside Zone 1, the main building of the NY Hall of Science at World Maker Faire.

by nicknormal at October 02, 2016 01:11 PM

‘Megachordotron’ is a Simple MIDI Controller Built with Teensy, First Seen at World #MakerFaire #WMF16

Will Ware (actual last name!) built this … ware, a MIDI controller assembled around a simple wood-and-hardware interface, using Teensy 3.1 or 3.2, “organized around chords, designed for people too clumsy to play a guitar.” And it sounds pretty cool too!

 
And the best part is the project’s build notes are completely open-sourced and available here on GitHub!

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Here’s a more sound-balanced video of Will demoing his instrument with some explanation:

 
Read more.

by nicknormal at October 02, 2016 08:15 AM

September 28, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Diving into the Homestead Crater Wearing a Glowing SCUBA Suit #Utah #WearableWednesday

This is cool. Recently the bridge over the Homestead Crater in Utah was removed and some swimmers were allowed to dive into it, including a member of the USA Cliff Diving team who donned a glowing (likely EL wire, although the article calls it an “LED light suit.”). And thanks to Elizabeth for sending this in!

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On a dark night, four people recently dove from a height of five stories into Midway’s Homestead Crater.

One of the divers was Andy Jones, a member of the USA Cliff Diving team who is on the Red Bull cliff diving circuit and grew up in Sandy. He donned an LED light suit for the event, which was hosted by Nu Skin.

Read more.

by nicknormal at September 28, 2016 11:29 AM

September 26, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Pictures from the Red Hook Regatta in Brooklyn of DIY & 3D-Printed RC Boats @PioneerWorks_

Yesterday was a beautiful day throughout the five boroughs of New York City, and an especially great day for navigating DIY and 3D-printed radio-controlled boats on the Red Hook Channel in the Upper New York Bay! The 2nd annual Red Hook Regatta is an initiative of Pioneer Works, a nearby non-profit arts center and event space. The Regatta supplies makers with some components and parts to assemble a DIY or 3D-printed boat, to be radio-controlled from the beach while attempting to deliver ‘cargo’ in the form of foam blocks to nearby piers. The distance from the shore to the piers was quite far consider the scale of the boats (less than 2′ in length). Any boat that ran aground or died in the water was retrieved by a human in a kayak.

Boats were divided into two camps: DIY & 3D-printed; the latter is obvious and the former were basically anything goes, including a toy converted into a vessel, a mostly-foam (I think) boat, and even a ‘trash boat’ that consisted of trash vacuum-sealed in some sort of container (it didn’t last long!). The event mostly consisted of 3D-printed boats, some of which can be seen below.

Shoutout: Adafruit’s own Dano Wall (with our fabrication department) who competed with his 3D-printed boat Infinity Wake! (see photo below)

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Support 'crew' assembling a wearable (see the hole in the middle!) ship.
Support 'crew' assembling a wearable (see the hole in the middle!) ship – just for fun!

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Pioneer Works 3D-printed and gave a rudder for each entrant who wanted one.
Pioneer Works 3D-printed and gave a rudder for each entrant who wanted one.

Boat builders were free to decorate their crafts ;)
Boat builders were free to decorate their crafts 😉

I like this retro-futuristic design, bottom-view.
I like this retro-futuristic design, bottom-view.

A giant solar panel powered one quadrant of the event!
A giant solar panel powered one quadrant of the event!

Makers fine-tuning their ships before launch surrounded by on-lookers.
Makers fine-tuning their ships before launch surrounded by on-lookers.

Adafruit's own Dano (fabrication) and his highly competitive boat!
Adafruit's own Dano (fabrication) and his highly competitive boat!

One of the boat's jet-like tail designs.
One of the boat's jet-like tail designs.

The 'cargo' each ship had to carry were foam blocks wrapped with slotted flat bar.
The 'cargo' each ship had to carry were foam blocks wrapped with slotted flat bar.

A 'red hook' fishing hook with magnets on the bottom would retrieve each ship's cargo block.
A 'red hook' fishing hook with magnets on the bottom would retrieve each ship's cargo block.

3D-printed ships at sea!
3D-printed ships at sea!

One ship heading for the 2-point pier, with the Statue of Liberty in the background!
One ship heading for the 2-point pier, with the Statue of Liberty in the background!

Boat-makers standing on the beach navigating their RC boats!
Boat-makers standing on the beach navigating their RC boats!

A DJI Phantom drone flew overhead recording video to be published later.
A DJI Phantom drone flew overhead recording video to be published later.

And lastly here’s a quick clip showing how the boats delivered ‘cargo’ which got retrieved by the magnetized ‘red hook.’


UPDATE: Thanks to Alicia for sending in these great pics of Uttam Grandhi and Kirill Shevyakov from team La Cornuta who tied for 1st! Their boat has some great design work on the hull!

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David Sheinkopf from Pioneer Works presents the two 1st place winning teams on stage after the completed heats. Congrats to all the winners!

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by nicknormal at September 26, 2016 07:27 PM

September 04, 2016

The Daily Duino

Strategien für binäre Optionen

Binary Options-Strategien: Tipps für Ihr Trading setzen alles auf eine Karte. Money Management ist nicht unbedingt aufregend, aber auch die wichtigsten Regeln des Überlebens in einen kommerziellen dynamischen Binary Options Trades 60 Sek. Niemals viel Geld in einem Vertrag, als dass ein Verlust für Sie verletzen würde. Dann können (= Bargeld) zu handeln, haben Sie immer noch zu sein: Noch wichtiger ist, denke ich, eine noch längere warten zu verlieren. Tun Sie es nicht, sich in einem bestimmten Markt zu beheben. Dieses Phänomen, wie die Psychologie der Markthändler auf den Märkten für den Handel sie am besten kennen, die offenbar eine Gewohnheit ist. sperren, wie zwei oder drei Märkte, kann man nicht, aber wenn Sie eine Menge von Optionen haben, und die Konstellationen in einem schlechten Risiko / Ertrags-Verhältnis nicht unbedingt handeln. hohe Trefferquote: Dies ist der wirksamste Hebel haben Sie zu schwächen, um zu gewinnen.

Handle nur Strategie. Handel, geben Sie bitte Ihre Strategie macht nur Sinn, wenn es aus dem Handel abgeschlossen ist. Wenn Sie – Langeweile, aus Habgier oder aus anderen Gründen – wandern und Strategie “”rot oder schwarz”” spielen sie, dann werden Sie wahrscheinlich Ihre gesamte Kontoguthaben sehr schnell verlieren. Die Anziehungskraft der binären Optionen in der Tat, daß es keine “”absolute”” ist eine Wahrscheinlichkeitsverteilung. Dies ist eine binäre Option Strategies Umgebung, ohne Zweifel ein schwieriges, sicher nicht ohne Chance.

BDSwiss

Um die Verwendung von einfachen Strategien. Einfache Strategien sind weniger wirksam als komplexe Computermodelle. Verwenden Sie vor allem in der Entry-Level 1-2 für die einfachen Strategien (zB Bollinger Bands und Trendfolgestrategien) und spezialisieren sich diese Ansätze. Denken Sie wie ein Ökonom: Da Sie bereits eine Gewinnrendite, die Kosten für Ihre Optimierungsprozess etabliert haben (= Verlust-Optionen) minimiert wird.

Trading Trading von Lernstrategien Sie BDSwiss

Die Analyse in Ihrem Zeitrahmen. 60 Wenn Sie eine zweite Chance haben, zu handeln, den Markt in einem sehr kurzen Zeitrahmen zu analysieren. CNN Es gibt eine “”intakte Aufwärtstrend”” Dow Jones Hinweis darauf, dass diese Zahl für mehrere Monate in Bezug genommen und ist jetzt Handel schwach blieb. Langfristige Trends sind einfach irrelevant für die meisten binären Optionen Strategien. Lassen Sie “”Marktexperten”” bleiben. Einige sagen, dass die “”Experten”” in der Lage sein, die Entwicklung des Marktes zu prognostizieren. Das ist Unsinn: Niemand weiß sicher, was der Markt in Zukunft tun wird. Dann empirisch fundierten Marktprognose Wahrscheinlichkeit ist ein wirksames Verfahren (technische Analyse, etc.) berücksichtigt erstellt wurde. Wer hat dieses Handwerk beherrscht, dauerhaft erfolgreiche Aktion – und noch nicht in die Zukunft sehen kann. Verwenden Sie die richtigen Werkzeuge. Die meisten Binäre Optionen Broker-Plattform sind ziemlich sparce. Es begann mit einem kostenlosen Demo-Konto ein CFD / FX Broker für eine unbestimmte Zeit und eine gute Budget zu ernähren. In fast jedem Konto Demo viele Arten von Diagrammen, Anzeigen und so integriert (zum Beispiel der Broker Plus500) mit einer breiten Palette von Charting-Software. Dies wird Ihre Binary Broker sein haben Sie freien Zugang zu unabhängigen und wirksamen Werkzeug erhalten. Eine gute Strategie für mindestens die Hälfte der Schlacht ist unser Know-how in bestimmten Titel und die Hintergrundinformationen Sie binäre Optionen Trades 60 Sekunden handeln. Die Plattform ist schnell und einfach, aber es ist gut vorbereitet, eine eingeben Trading! Zusätzlich zu den oben genannten Tipps beziehen sich Binäre Optionen für den Handel, die tatsächliche Wirkung der anderen 60 s Geschäfte, Händler sollten jedoch noch weitere Tipps beherzigen, die auf dem Prinzip der Handel mit binären Optionen erweitert werden kann. Nähere Informationen findet ihr auch bei IQ Option Tipps. So zum Beispiel, ist es zunächst wichtig, ein paar Dinge zu beachten, wenn Sie den richtigen Broker zu wählen. Handelsplattform, Arbeitsbedingungen und die Tatsache, dass es entscheidend ist, so erfolgreich, wie es mit später in den Optionen behandelt werden können. Im Folgenden sind daher alle paar Ratschläge erste, durch die Auswahl von Binary Options Brokers gefolgt, oder die 60-Sekunden-Handel mit binären Optionen in der Regel sollten Maßnahmen ergriffen werden.

4) Die folgenden Punkte sind die Möglichkeit, von größerer Bedeutung Broker

Vor allem, wenn es um die Verteilung Punkte kommt, zu achten ist, wenn das Recht Binäre Optionen Broker der Wahl der verschiedenen Gruppen zu berücksichtigen. Vor allem müssen die folgenden Kategorien zu zahlen, wenn ein Broker und als Ergebnis unserer 60-Sekunden-Werbespot in einem Bereich von Tipps zu beachten bei der Auswahl:

BDswiss Handelsplattform

Darüber hinaus hängt der Broker natürlich auch bei der Auswahl, welche Leistungen angeboten werden. Hier ist ein Demo-Konto und Sie müssen sicherstellen, dass, wenn möglich, kann der Handel mobil gemacht werden. Darüber hinaus sind viele Makler noch anbieten und andere Dienstleistungen, die von Fall zu Fall variieren. Hier empfiehlt es Fortschritte zu berichten oder einfach nur die Möglichkeit des Vergleichs verwenden, nicht in der Lage mit den verschiedenen Brokern in Bezug auf ihre Leistungen zu bewältigen. Der Handel mit diesen Bedingungen die natürlich von großer Bedeutung, wenn es darum geht, die einzelnen Broker Vergleich. Vor allem die folgenden Bedingungen, die in den Handel mit binären Optionen sein muss, und zwar auch 60 Sekunden handelt Handel mit binären Optionen

 

 

by George Roberts at September 04, 2016 09:19 AM