Arduino Planet

April 27, 2018

adafruit industries blog

Lipstick Tray #3DThursday #3DPrinting

8183494db5b979cb55f687142330de95 preview featured

Shared by Hagenauto on Thingiverse:

Simple lipstick tray that allows lipsticks to be displayed bottom up so you can read the labels. Save them rattling around too – ideal for use in a drawer. Fits most sizes and allows you to get hold of them. All the edges are very gently rounded.

Download the files and learn more


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

by Ben at April 27, 2018 01:00 AM

Ultimate iPhone Gaming/Cooling Controller #3DPrinting #3DThursday

C270eb7dd0e8b6b2e46e7b8efb3a1362 preview featured

glang25 shared this project on Thingiverse!

This is the Ultimate iPhone Gaming Controller (now with universal design uploaded as well)! It is designed to fit the iPhone 7 (without a case), and should also fit the iPhone 6/6S (not tested). It provides the perfect ergonomic handle for using your phone in landscape orientation and can keep your phone from overheating! The controller does not interfere with any of the iPhone’s buttons, speakers, or ports.

UPDATE: There is also a “Universal” design uploaded. It uses a clip that snaps into the square opening on the front at different depths. The clip isn’t super tight, so maybe you can come up with a better design! The opening in the front is just a 6mm square.

There is room for a common 40x40x10mm cooling fan to snap in. I used the one that came stock with my Maker Select printer and spliced it into a 5V USB charging cable. It keeps my phone much cooler than without, but I may add a 5V to 12V booster to bump up the power.

The notch out of the front face is to add a capacitive touch trigger to be able to map to buttons on the screen such as with Rules of Survival. If you want to design something else to fit in there, the hole is 6x6x20mm.

See more!


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

by Jessie Mae at April 27, 2018 12:00 AM

April 26, 2018

Dangerous Prototypes

Multisensor LoRa device

p-tlmv2-600

Mare published a new build:

The described device is nearly matchbox-sized board (50 x 24 mm) packed with sensors. Auxilary board is 10x50mm with additional sensors. The module is developed around the Murata ABZ LoRa module, which integrates STM32L072 and samtech SX1276 in tiny 12.5 x 11.6 x 1.76 mm package.

More details at Mare & Gal Electronics.

by DP at April 26, 2018 11:59 PM

DIY Moteino guide

p-image9-600

Felix writes, “I posted a short illustrated guide for making your own Moteino from SMD components. It also includes details how to burn the bootloader and fuses. Check it out here. Thanks and credit goes to forum user LukaQ for his contribution of the images and test sketches in this guide!

See the full post at LowPowerLab.

by DP at April 26, 2018 11:33 PM

adafruit industries blog

Measure your blowing power #3DThursday #3DPrinting

5bc0c40d5be93f0f330e8fe6b4761dc9 preview featured

Shared by WillemvD on Thingiverse:

This is not a medical instrument, that is why it is listed under toys. It is fun to compare the blowing power of different people. The airstream will rotate a fanblade linked to the shaft of a small DC motor, which acts as a generator. The current charges a capacitor. To prevent dischargeing over the DC motor, a diode is inserted. In this way, if you have a capacitor with low leak, the value can be measured more easily. The output voltage is in the order of 5 volts. Instead of using a multimeter, a led scale can be applied as well.
A push button over the capacitor discharges the capacitor and the circuit is than ready for a new measurement. By replacing the two resistors by a 5K trimpotentiometer, the sensitivity can be changed. A box design is up to you.
https://youtu.be/VyUaCc8frQk

Download the files and learn more


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

by Ben at April 26, 2018 11:00 PM

Arduino Blog

Robot Van Gogh will paint your portrait

Maker Faire Rome, where everything started

I participated in Maker Faire Rome back in December 2017. I came with the rest of the Arduino crew to spend two days talking to other makers in the show, check out the projects made in the field of education and to…  get a portrait painted. Now seriously, I hadn’t planned to get a painting of my beard made at Maker Faire, it just happened. I was walking around together with Marcus, one of the guys running the Arduino Education web infrastructure, when I saw my own picture on a computer screen at a not-so-distant booth. We came closer just to satisfy my curiosity, and then the surprise… there was a robot making my portrait!

The process of making this portrait was not exactly short, the robot moves back and forth every couple of brush strokes to get some more paint. The colors are created by dipping into small containers. Imagine a CNC of sorts moving on the X-Y plane and making a small movement with the brush in order to make a mark on the canvas. My portrait is made of several A4 pages glued together, as you can see in the picture. In total it takes several hours to produce a portrait like this one.

You can see the first traces made by the machine while painting my portrait in the following video.

The painting robot was built by Jose Salatino, a painter gone roboticist that used to go around making portraits to famous musicians and giving the paintings away to them. He told me that this is how he started in the art world. At some point he wanted to bring together his life passion with his hobby (electronics) and got interested into painting robots (seems like there is a whole niche there I haven’t explored yet) and realized that very few people were really using a painter’s technique to mix the colors. That triggered him into learning more about machines in general, and machines that could paint in particular.

[Jose’s self portrait process, image courtesy of Jose Salatino]

The machine itself

The painter robot, which I came to call Van Gogh because of its painting style, is a two-axis machine that can be programmed to move all over the canvas. The machine uses the technique of creating a color by mixing first basic pigments (blue, yellow, red) and then dipping the brush again into one of a series of containers grading from white to black. This is, Jose told me, how he would mix the paint: first dip into the different containers of basic color (e.g. to make a bright green, need to dip once in blue and maybe three times in yellow), second assign the luminosity by dipping into a certain gray color. When asked about whether the paint containers would not get dirty by doing so, Jose replied that so it goes when painting for him. The colors get dirty on the palette and you need to keep on adding new color. And this is when I realized that I was totally over engineering the project in my head when I tried to imagine how I would do it. Check the robot in action in the following video.

Note the sponge used to clean the brush before reloading it with paint, yet another master move, in my opinion. You can read more about the machine by visiting the project’s write-up here

The contest Jose is participating in

Jose has entered a robotics painting contest with the works made by his robot. One of the proposed pieces is actually my portrait. 🙂 

The 2018 “3rd Annual” International Robotic Art Competition’s goal is to challenge teams to produce something visually beautiful with robotics – that is, to have a robot use physical brushes and paint to create an artwork.

Jose’s robot is all about brushes, as I already told you. And he is all for the competition, for which he teamed up with his kids who learned everything that was needed to make the robot paint as it does. The idea is that, in case he won this contest, 90% off the $100.000 USD prize would be donated to an NGO in the US. Are you interested in art? More specifically, are you into robotic art? Then visit the contest’s site, register, and vote for your favorite pieces. If you voted for Jose’s work, you could also help him choose an NGO where to give the money away: Red Cross, Black Girls Code, Learn2Teach-Teach2Learn… as he lives in Barcelona, he doesn’t really know who he would give the price to in the US. Jose is open to suggestions, but remember he needs your vote first!

Check the whole contest here and Jose’s entry here.

Read more about Jose

If you are interested in reading more about Jose’s project, his daughter, Flor, made a very nice interview and reflection about the role of the artist when there is a machine making the work. This is something I bet many readers were wondering by now: “if the machine paints it, who is the one to be credited, the machine or the person making the machine?” In my opinion, and since I am one of the models, I think we–the models giving away our image–should be also getting some credit, or? (Note: this last sentence was a joke!)

by dcuartielles at April 26, 2018 06:40 PM

SparkFun Electronics News

Enginursday: LilyPad and Minecraft Heads

It is widely acknowledged that children love Minecraft. They also tend to love things that glow. So why not combine these into a super-mega-happy-awesome project? Behold, the Enderman head:

Enderman Costume

Spawned from an overabundance of cardboard boxes, a few extraneous Pixel Boards, and some spray paint and fancy sewing, we now have a glowy-eyed Enderman head that brings all the neighborhood kids to the yard.

To make this project, I used the following:

LilyPad Arduino USB - ATmega32U4 Board

LilyPad Arduino USB - ATmega32U4 Board

DEV-12049
$24.95
7
Lithium Ion Battery - 850mAh

Lithium Ion Battery - 850mAh

PRT-13854
$9.95
2
Conductive Thread Bobbin - 12m (Smooth, Stainless Steel)

Conductive Thread Bobbin - 12m (Smooth, Stainless Steel)

DEV-13814
$3.95
LilyPad Pixel Board

LilyPad Pixel Board

DEV-13264
$3.95

The LilyPad line has some pretty amazing documentation - I followed the LilyPad Pixel Board Hookup Guide to get my board and pixel boards all hooked up. There’s also a wishlist in this hookup guide that has pretty much everything you need!

LilyPad Pixel Board Hookup Guide

If you’ve never worked with e-textiles or the LilyPad line, I recommend starting here:

Getting Started With LilyPad

In addition to the hookup guide wishlist, you will also need the following:

  • A box that fits your child’s head (SparkFun boxes are PERFECT)
  • Some black foam board
  • Black spray paint
  • Glue, tape, or a glue gun
  • Two opaque acrylic rectangles
  • A child

For the box, we glued the top flaps shut for the painting and left the bottom open for ease of assembly. Once we were all painted up, we cut an appropriately sized hole out of the bottom for the head to fit through. We also measured about halfway down the box and cut holes for the acrylic eye plates. Keep in mind that you will need to cut another hole above these eye plates so your kiddo can see out of the box. Also - don’t mount those acrylic plates yet!

Box and foam board cutouts

Now for the fun stuff! The Pixel Boards, Arduino and LiPo battery are all mounted on a foam board strip inside the box head.

I cut the foam board strip a little longer than the box width to help with mounting. I centered it on the box and folded the ends back as flaps. Once it was folded and in place, I marked where I wanted the glowing eyes from the front of the box.

Once I knew where the Pixel Board eyes would go, I set about sewing the Pixel Boards as well as the Arduino to the foam board strip. I mounted the Arduino controller on the backside of the strip so that the lithium battery could also be mounted on the back of the strip. This makes for easy access to the on/off switch and for battery charging. Again, refer back to the tutorials listed above if you have never worked with conductive thread.

Foam Strip with Arduino and Pixel boards

After verifying that the circuits were working and my Pixel Boards glowed a beautiful purple color, it was time to mount everything!

Start with the acrylic plates. I just used clear tape on the inside of the box to affix these guys into place. I also used spacers - three sets of them - to offset and stabilize the foam strip carrying the Pixel Boards. I used the same foam board (four thick) and my trusty glue gun to fix these into place. I then glued the Pixel Board flaps into place and switched it on.

Box Interior Lit up

A few notes:

  • Before sewing the circuits, I used a ballpoint pen to draw the connection lines on my foam strip to ensure connections would be made appropriately and that there would be no shorts. I also used the needle to poke holes along those circuit lines so that the actual sewing would be easier.

  • After sewing the circuits, I used a glue gun to seal the loose ends to the foam board. This prevents shorts from happening!

  • While I used clear packing tape to set both the acrylic eye plates as well as the battery in place, I used a glue gun to secure the foam board spacers as well as the Arduino and the flaps of the Pixel Board strip.

  • We ended up using black yarn to sew a baseball cap into the interior of the box (which was no small feat) to keep the box from sliding around on the kiddo’s head. We also ended up cutting an eye slot above the glowing eyes and putting a black mesh on the inside of it to keep his face obscured.

We had a great time making this project and it was a great way to get a kiddo involved and learning about circuits! What projects have you made with LilyPad? Let us know in the comments!

comments | comment feed

by Lori Crotser at April 26, 2018 01:00 PM

April 25, 2018

SparkFun Electronics News

Getting started with Arduino cryptography

I’m always looking for a way to teach difficult concepts in classroom settings, especially if I can lean on the confluence of my love of tinkering and my love of puzzles.

alt text

An Enigma code machine

I bought a new house several months ago and it has a garage. I don’t want to buy new garage remotes (that would be much too easy) when I can build them out of parts that SparkFun sells everyday. The thought occurred to me that it would be fun to do in encrypted wireless using an XBee module; that way I could program not only commands for the garage door, but for lights and the front door and anything else that I can put on electronic control.

alt text

A basic substitution cipher

At the heart of the way we do business on the web is RSA encryption. RSA is a brilliant and complicated way to encrypt information using large prime numbers. As many of us can remember from algebra, the prime factorization of large numbers can be very difficult. RSA relies on using this within a framework of modular exponentiation and totient equations to pass information safely.

All of this is very effective for secure banking transactions, but probably not necessary for turning on lights at my house.

alt text

alt text

An early puzzle box I built with BASIC STAMP.

When I started thinking about this problem I did, however, take some of the way we think about RSA encryption and applied it to a simple Arduino program. Here is how I thought about my problem:

  1. Using an Arduino base station to store an array of three-digit numbers.

  2. Use the random function in Arduino to generate a random number, store it in a variable and subtract it from a random place in the array.

  3. Pass the place in the array and difference generated to a client device as values separated by commas.

  4. If the client device has the matching array as the base station, it will subtract the number it received from the specific place in the array, and pass the difference back to the base station.

  5. The base station will add the answer it receives from the requesting device to the number stored in the variable. If the sum of these two things is equivalent to the place in the array that the base station has been working with, it will grant access to the client device.

Let’s look at this in action!

My array = {103,147,171,199}

My random number generated = 59

My random pace in the array = 2

So: 171-59 = 112

I pass to a device requesting access (2,112).

If that device has the same array stored on it as my key array on the base station, it will subtract what it received from the specified place in the array.

 171-112 = 59

I send back to the base station a request (like the character “r”) and 59, so the transmission would be (r,59).

The base station then adds the number it receives - if that number and the number it sent are equivalent to the value in that place in the array, it grants the request. In my Arduino code I have set it up so that our lights are red LEDs.

Here’s some Arduino code; test it with the serial terminal.

///////////////////////

int keys[]=

{117,161,173,187,199};

int arryPos=0;

char request;

int arrayPos;

int subtractNum;

int returnVal;

int red=0;

int blue=0;

int green=0;

void setup()

{
Serial.begin(9600);



pinMode(13,OUTPUT);

pinMode(12,OUTPUT);

pinMode(11,OUTPUT);

pinMode(10,OUTPUT);

pinMode(9,OUTPUT);


}


void loop()

{


//subtractNum=10;




  if(Serial.available()!=0)

  {

request= Serial.read();

 digitalWrite(13, HIGH);

if(request=='a')

{

arrayPos=(random(0,4));

subtractNum=(random(1,100));



delay(10);

Serial.print(arrayPos);

Serial.print(",");

Serial.println(keys[arrayPos]-subtractNum);


}

if(request=='r')

{

 returnVal=Serial.parseInt();

Serial.print("array val =");

Serial.println(keys[arrayPos]);

Serial.print(returnVal + keys[arrayPos]-subtractNum);//subtractNum=10+ x = 117

delay(50);

if(returnVal + keys[arrayPos]-subtractNum==keys[arrayPos])

{

digitalWrite(9,HIGH);

delay(350);

digitalWrite(9,LOW);

delay(350);

digitalWrite(9,HIGH);

delay(350);

digitalWrite(9,LOW);

delay(350);

digitalWrite(9,HIGH);

delay(350);

digitalWrite(9,LOW);

delay(350);

}

}


}

digitalWrite(13,LOW);

}

//////////////////////

When you get this code loaded to the Arduino, you can then follow these steps:

  1. Open a terminal in Arduino and send your board the character “a.”

alt text

  1. You will receive two values separated by commas. The first value is the place in the array, and the second value is what to subtract from the value in the array.

alt text

  1. Return the character “r,” separated from the difference with a comma.

alt text

  1. You should get a return equivalent to the array value and the sum of the two values. If you have an LED connected to pin 9, it should blink.

alt text

The next step is creating a device to send the serial commands. This could be another Arduino, and this is where it really opens up. The client could be a traditional remote with push-button function, or a keypad, or even a fingerprint reader.

I think the classroom applications of this project are particularly interesting. The idea I had was to let students “tune into” the traffic being passed back and forth, and try to figure out the key array based on the behavior of the packets – seems like a great hacking/cryptography prompt.

I am adding code to my GitHub page, so you are welcome to dig around there and take this further. Happy hacking!

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by Jeffrey Branson at April 25, 2018 01:00 PM

April 24, 2018

Dangerous Prototypes

How servo motors work and how to control servos using Arduino

p-Arduino-and-PCA9685-PWM-Servo-Driver-600

Dejan Nedelkovski over at HowToMechatronics shared detailed tutorial on how servo motors work and how to control servos using Arduino and PCA9685 PWM driver:

There are many types of servo motors and their main feature is the ability to precisely control the position of their shaft. A servo motor is a closed-loop system that uses position feedback to control its motion and final position.
In industrial type servo motors the position feedback sensor is usually a high precision encoder, while in the smaller RC or hobby servos the position sensor is usually a simple potentiometer. The actual position captured by these devices is fed back to the error detector where it is compared to the target position. Then according to the error the controller corrects the actual position of the motor to match with the target position.
In this tutorial we will take a detailed look at the hobby servo motors. We will explain how these servos work and how to control them using Arduino.

More details at HowToMechatronics.

Check out the video after the break.

 

by DP at April 24, 2018 11:57 PM

Arduino Blog

A look back at CTC Valencia Fair 2018

On April 18th, a team from Arduino Education made it to the museum Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias in Valencia to participate in the CTC Valencia Fair. A total of 1,200 students (out of 1,500 people in attendance) participated in the five-hour-long event where the students exhibited what they had been producing over the last couple of months.

CTC, the Creative Technologies in the Classroom initiative

CTC started as a project in the region of Castilla La Mancha in Spain. I was asked what kind of process could be implemented in order to bring teachers and school up to speed with new educational technologies. Back then, in 2012, I had been teaching students from many different disciplines, mostly at the university level: interaction design, medicine, engineering, product design, mathematics, multimedia, fine arts… I had also been working with upper secondary school teachers from Spain, Argentina, and Sweden in the creation of small curriculums introducing interactive technologies a part of more transversal teaching in subjects like science and design.

When asked by the people in charge at the regional centre for educators in Castilla La Mancha, I suggested a quick iterative design process that began with a collective survey to teachers in 25 schools and followed by a curriculum suggestion on topics that they considered relevant. The most complex aspect in this process was how to design interventions in the way of implementing this programme so that I could incorporate the teachers’ as well as the students’ opinions and debug the content as we went. CTC has over 25 different mid-size experiments designed to help a class get acquainted to work in a project-based learning methodology through an iterative process.

The first CTC fair brought together over 400 students from all over Castilla La Mancha that presented 100-plus projects. Almost five years later, we have witnessed yet another incredible fair with very nice results, only this time in Valencia.

What has changed

CTC now includes experiments with wireless technology, accelerometers, capacitive sensing, motors, lights, and other interesting tricks, thanks to using the Arduino 101 board that comes with BLE, an IMU, and some other goodies. Students are introduced to programming using Processing and the Arduino IDE. But not everything is coding, given our pedagogic approach, they learn how to work in groups, search for technical information, organize time, and present their results…

On the Arduino side, we have jumped from having a good old WordPress site to enable communication between the students, to a full-fledged platform that is being augmented with new materials and courses on a yearly basis. The content works for both the classic IDE and the more modern Create IDE. At the same time, we have implemented a hotline where teachers can ask questions directly to Arduino’s support specialists. Of course, there is a forum just for teachers to talk to one another and the Arduino forum still supporting them; but we have learned that teachers like one-to-one communication because each school is somehow different in terms of equipment, network facilities, classrooms and policies, and social environment–teachers, students, and their families.

We have learned about complex deployments; for example, in Valencia there is a special Linux distribution called Lliurex that we had to hack in order to get the IDE running properly. During a previous project in Andalucia, teachers had no administration password to the computers! Well, we did figure things out and got the project to work. So big kudos to our support team that had to get out the hacker hoodie and code a clever solution!

Also, for the CTC webinars we make on a bi-weekly basis, we have changed our online seminar backend to have a much more efficient one. Now our calls allow full interaction with the participants that can be invited to talk and share screens when needed instead of simply having a chat line back.

Valencia is cool, isn’t it?

We had a CTC fair at the Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, a museum by Santiago Calatrava in the shape of a huge boat put upside-down. There are fountains surrounding the building, the weather was amazing (remember I am coming from Sweden, where we just had the worst winter in 10 years, so anything over 15°C is good at this point), the organizers from CEFIRE (the teacher organization in Valencia’s region) made a great preparation of the location, schools arrived on time, the show went fine-great-FABULOUS… so yes, Valencia is cool, and the so was the CTC fair.

On stage we could see almost 30 projects being presented by the students, while we conducted a two and a half-hour livecast for those interested in seeing the projects from anywhere in the world. We held 15 interviews, but unfortunately we couldn’t show everything happening, considering that there were a more than 150 projects on display!

The following video is a summary of livestream from the museum; for your benefit, we have chosen some highlights of the broadcast I conducted throughout the day.

The interviews were conducted in Spanish, which is another reason for the summary; but if you are interested in the actual interviews, check out the following video.

Some seriously nice projects

I cannot stop being surprised by the amount of creativity students show when making projects. Even if I attend an average of five events of this nature per year, I keep on finding projects that make an impression in me. Students are always challenging any pre-conceptions I might have about what could be done with something as simple as an Arduino board. The one thing teachers keep on saying again and again is that it was them, the students, that pushed the process forward, that once they got started with the course, it was hard not to get carried away by the students initiative. The role of the teachers is playing the realist, trying to make sure the projects come to an end. That said, here some of the things I saw while walking around in the fair.

Probably the most impressive project I came across was a model of the Hogwart’s castle inspired by the Harry Potter movies. It took the students four months to build the entire project. It was a replica of the castle, so heavy that it needed four people to carry it around. It had dragons flying around one tower, the lights could be turned on and off… there was even a fountain with running water! The whole mode could be controlled via Bluetooth from an Android tablet. In total, the model took three months to construct, the students said, while making the electronics and software work took one month.

On the other side of the spectrum, I could play with a small arm wrestling toy made by a single student that took only 5 hours to build. You can check out the interview with the student in the above-posted videos. While the project seems to be simple, it is clear that the student had become quite knowledgeable in the craft of making projects, since he had figured everything for the project on his own without any external help.

One last project I would like to talk about was a small drawing machine comprised of mechanics from DVD drives that could replicate small drawings (less than 10x10cm big) using a pen. The students explained that it barely worked the night before, but that they finally figured out the calibration process minutes before leaving for the fair. The results, as you can see on the video interviews, are quite remarkable. They can export drawings using the open source program Inkscape in a format (G-code) their machine can understand, this allows them to trace any kind of vectorized drawing and reproduce it with their machine.

There were a lot more projects, take a look at the videos and pictures in this blog post. We will be presenting some others as part of the Arduino Livecast series in the the future. If you want to know more, just subscribe to Arduino’s YouTube channel and you will get weekly notifications on our videos.

Acknowledgements

The CTC Valencia project has been possible thanks to the generous contribution of EduCaixa, the on-site collaboration of the technical body at CEFIRE, the kind support of the regional government of Valencia – the Generalitat -, and the help of our old friend Ultralab.

From everyone involved in the project, big thanks to Ismael and Oscar, who believed in the project and pushed for it. Personally I want to thank Nerea who coordinated the project, and Roxana who was there making it happen from Arduino on a weekly basis; also Carla and Carlos who covered up when needed. Finally to Laura, who worked long evenings on top of everything else to make all of graphics needed for the fair.

At a more technical level, we have a new revision to the look and feel of the CTC project site coming, and it is looking awesome. Marcus, Gabrielle, Luca and everyone working with the UX in Arduino are creating one of the best-looking educational experiences ever. If not only the content is good, but if it feels good and looks good, then the experience will be excellent!

Do you want CTC in your world?

If you want to be part of the CTC initiative, visit Arduino Education’s website, subscribe to the Arduino Education Newsletter [at the bottom of that site], or send us a request for more information via email: ctc.101@arduino.cc.

[Photos by Pablo Ortuño]

by dcuartielles at April 24, 2018 07:58 PM

NYC Resistor

Introduction to 3D Computer Modeling with Rhino3D on May 6th

Come join us for a class! Tickets are available on Eventbrite.

This class is limited to twelve students, reserve your spot now!
Three-dimensional computer models are used for concept design, prototyping on a 3D printer, making furniture on a CNC, creating realistically rendered images, making animations or games, and much more. In this class, you’ll learn how to navigate 3D software and create computer models from scratch using Rhino3D. The software is easy to learn and is a great starting point for working in three-dimensions no matter what you want to create. You’ll learn the fundamentals of working with various viewports, creating and editing basic and advanced geometry, as well as how to tailor your project for laser cutting and 3D printing.
You will create 3D computer models in Rhino3D throughout the class building your experience and knowledge. Learning how to operate the 3D printer and Laser Cutter are separate classes available at NYCresistor. You are invited back to NYCResistor on an open Craft Night on the evening of Thursday, May 10th where the instructor will be available to help 1-to-1 with your projects. If that Craft Night doesn’t suit your schedule, please get in touch and we can hopefully arrange an alternative.
You should bring a laptop to the class and a click-button mouse. Download a 90-day free trial of Rhino3D before the class. The trial software is available on both Apple and Windows operating systems. Download trial Apple / Windows. To maximize the length of your trial, don’t install your software until the morning of the class.
This class will be taught by James McBennett who trained in architecture and specialized in advanced geometry. These are two examples of projects he worked on using Rhino 3D, Holmenkollen / This Stool Rocks. James will be available for Q&A by email after the class, assuring everyone achieves their goal. NYC Resistor member Olivia Barr will also be present for this class.
As with all NYC Resistor events, this class is 18+ and governed by our Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct, as well as accessibility information, can be found at www.nycresistor.com/participate/. Please note that refunds must be requested 72 hours in advance. If you have any questions, please email classes@nycresistor.com.

Get your tickets on Eventbrite.

by Classes at April 24, 2018 01:00 PM

SparkFun Electronics News

DIY 3D-Printed Ink Stamps

My adventures in 3D printing have taken me from DIY cookie cutters to the next logical place: DIY 3D-Printed Stamps. As an avid crafter, I am beyond excited about my newfound ability to make customized crafting tools using the 3D printer.

Making 3D-printed stamps is not as simple as designing a model and hitting “print.” In order to imitate the rubbery material of a stamp itself, as well as the wooden handle, I needed to use two kinds of filament. For the handle, I used regular ABS, which is a hard plastic and common 3D-printing material. For the stamp, I used a special flexible filament called NinjaFlex. This rubbery material is perfect for printing flexible or softer objects. Given the inherent qualities of the material, it requires a specific extruder for your printer. Here at SparkFun we use LulzBot 3D printers, so I picked up their special FlexyStruder Tool Head. If you are thinking about buying a new tool head for your LulzBot printer to interface with flexible materials, I would actually recommend the Aerostruder Tool Head as it can print both felxible materials, like NinjaFlex, and normal hard plastics like ABS/PLA.

alt text

I had to work through a few small challenges in this project. The first issue I encountered was the natural texture of the 3D print on the stamp face. The grooves between the fine lines held on to the ink, and when I would press the stamp to paper, the texture came through clear as day. In order to combat this, I came up with a surface melting technique. I put my clothing iron on high, covered it with a piece of parchment paper, and pressed the face of my stamp against the iron face through the parchment paper. This effectively removed the linear texture from the stamp and offered a smooth surface. I lightly sanded the surface to give it a bit of tooth to hold onto the ink.

alt text

I also found that using a 100 percent infill for the rubbery part of the stamp gave it a stronger structure that was easier to work with when using it in practice. With a 20 - 50 percent infill, the stamp was kind of wobbly when I pressed it against paper, and I was getting results that were not as sharp as I hoped. With the higher infill, the stamp was more rigid and stable against the paper and the results were crisp.

alt text

I have so many ideas for different stamps I can barely pick which one to make next. Let us know what you think about this project in the comments below!

Interested in learning more about at-home 3D printing? Check out SparkFun’s 3D printers and supplies.

comments | comment feed

by Melissa Felderman at April 24, 2018 01:00 PM

April 23, 2018

Arduino Blog

1961 rotary phone gets a 2018 cellular upgrade

While it’s hard to beat today’s mobile devices functionality-wise, if you need a phone built like a tank and designed for voice communication and voice communication only, you can’t go wrong with the Western Electric Model 500 rotary telephone. As maker “bicapitate” shows on Imgur, these models include a generous amount of space inside, enough room in fact for an Arduino Uno along with a tiny Adafruit FONA module for cellular capabilities.

While project details are slim, it appears that the Uno takes pulses from the rotary input, then makes calls via the FONA. A DC motor drives the bell to indicate a call is being made, and the original headset, possibly modified with a new speaker and mic, is used for audio. It now also includes a LiPo battery, allowing you to use this wherever convenient—while still slamming the headset down with authority!

by Arduino Team at April 23, 2018 02:04 PM

April 11, 2018

adafruit industries blog

Custom Connector for 1980s-Era Canon X-07 Serial Port | #retrocomputing #3Dprinting

Amazing post from Ketturi electronics designing a custom adapter for a 35-year-old retro computer:

Canon X-07 is great little handheld retro computer. But being Canon, nothin is standard. Canon has always insisted using weird proprietary connector for devices, and usually it is impossible to find connectors that would fit them. This is also a case with X-07. It uses weird connectors for serial- and parallel ports. They look bit like a normal D-sub connector, and D-sub connector almost fits into them, but it is not a good fit. I wanted to make new connector that matches X-07’s serial port perfectly, so I took my callipers and 3D cad and started to work.

Read more here.


 

I soldered cable on contacts. Printed partes were not installed during soldering, and white acrylic pin holder did not melt like printed parts would have been. I also installed small strain relief rubber jacket over cable. Other end is just terminated with normal pin-header style connector, so that I can plug it into USB -> TTL serial port adapter. X-07 uses ~5V logic in the serial port, and it cannot be connected to normal RS232 port without level converter circuitry. There is also 4.6V output from batteries in one pin, that could power level converter, IR transmitter or maybe even bluetooth serial adapter. Connector also has software switchable 38,4kHz signal for infrared transmission modulation.

Read more.

by nicknormal at April 11, 2018 11:41 AM

April 09, 2018

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories

Electronics Flea Market: Now in Sunnyvale

Pile o' instruments

We’ve written about the Silicon Valley Electronics Flea Market many times before. Make that many, many, many, many, many, many, many, many times before. It’s a great source of inspiration, beautiful objects and interesting conversations.

We’re writing about it now because it has moved locations! The April 14th flea market will be at the parking lot of the Sunnyvale Fry’s. We’ll hope to see you all there this weekend!

by Lenore Edman at April 09, 2018 06:25 PM

April 05, 2018

NYC Resistor

Altered Wind-Up Toys (or Robot Cosmetic Mods) Make-Along on April 22

Come join us for a class! Tickets are available on Eventbrite.

This is not your typical craft class. Make-Along is a self-guided craft workshop where participants learn new skills, explore new materials, and make great things!

Aprils’s Topic: Altered WindUp Toys! (or Robot Cosmetic Mods)

Have you always wanted to literally make a new friend? Do toys that move delight you? Come and we’ll teach you how to modify a windup toy to give it a unique personality. So no matter your skill level or approach, you’ll bring home a one-of-a-kind re-styled toy! If you have a robot that could use a makeover, this would also be an excellent time to glam it up.

Are you a beginner? We’ll provide a windup toy, paints, glues, googly eyes, accessories, and lots of inspiration!

Are you a master? Show off your skills and inspire others! Bring a project, use our materials, and hang out in a great space while doing what you love.

This class will be taught by NYC Resistor member Kari Love. As with all NYC Resistor events, this class is 18+ and governed by our Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct, as well as accessibility information, can be found at www.nycresistor.com/participate/.
Please note that refunds must be requested 72 hours in advance. If you have any questions, please email classes@nycresistor.com.

Get your tickets on Eventbrite.

by Classes at April 05, 2018 03:00 PM

April 03, 2018

one girl's diary of improvisational engineering

scanlime031 – Zoom H2

Just a quick video as I keep the equipment running: my Zoom H2 microphone was damaged thanks to some leaky batteries, but a brush and some Deoxit and isopropanol help me get it running again.

Music for this episode is “Hot Drop Potato” by Jesse Spillane, licensed under CC BY 3.0

Please consider supporting me on Patreon so I can keep making these vids!

I’m also trying out Liberapay as an alternative to Patreon, if you’d like to check that out instead:

If you’d like some of those cool scanlime stickers or Servo AF stream gear, check out the shop.

For previous episodes, check out the full scanlime playlist.

Each episode is compiled together from many livestreams which you can hang out with on the companion scanlime-in-progress channel.

Follow @scanlimelive for live streaming announcements.

by Micah Scott at April 03, 2018 12:50 AM

March 30, 2018

NYC Resistor

9th Annual Interactive Show: Call For Projects (DATE CHANGED, see below)

[ATTENTION!  THE DATE HAS CHANGED TO JUNE 16th]

It’s time for another Interactive Show! This year’s theme is Self Driving Carbs. That’s not a typo right?  No?  OK let’s roll with it.

It’s about some time for some smart digital comfort food.   An Uber™ for doughnuts, a Facebook for foodies.  Have those empty calories of content algorithmically delivered into you consciousness.

So save the date for June 16th and drop us a line to submit your projects! Projects don’t necessarily have to be on theme, just something you want to show off at a party.

You can submit a project via this form

or email us: ishow AT nycresistor.com

or visit us on Facebook

OR join us on our public Slack:

 

via GIPHY

by widget widget widget at March 30, 2018 07:01 PM

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories

March 24, 2018

one girl's diary of improvisational engineering

scanlime030 – Why Reverse a Gimbal

Why do all this gimbal reversing? It works so nicely now, and I didn’t need to design the whole thing from scratch!

Notes and tools are in GitHub:
https://github.com/scanlime/fygimbal
https://github.com/TucoFlyer

Music for this episode is “I Don’t See the Branches, I See the Leaves” by Chris Zabriskie, licensed under CC BY 3.0

Please consider supporting me on Patreon so I can keep making these vids!

I’m also trying out Liberapay as an alternative to Patreon, if you’d like to check that out instead:

If you’d like some of those cool scanlime stickers or Servo AF stream gear, check out the shop.

You can find all of the source code and CAD models for this project on GitHub.

For previous episodes, check out the full scanlime playlist.

Each episode is compiled together from many livestreams which you can hang out with on the companion scanlime-in-progress channel.

Follow @scanlimelive for live streaming announcements.

by Micah Scott at March 24, 2018 05:48 PM

March 22, 2018

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories

Lemon Ginger Marmalade

It is lemon season here yet again! Given the quantity of fruit my Meyer lemon tree produces, I have many opportunities to remake my marmalade recipes with little adjustments and changes. This time, I added ginger. Quite a bit of ginger. This jam has a bright cheerful flavor with a bit of zing to it which is perfect for the rainy weather we’ve been having.

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups (Meyer) lemon pieces
  • 1 cup lemon juice
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 Tbsp grated ginger
  • 2/3 cup ginger matchsticks
  • 6 cups sugar

First cut up the lemons into small pieces and remove any obvious seeds. After juicing lemons, we’ve found that straining it through a julep strainer holds back the seeds but allows most of the pulp through.

Our favorite tool for grating ginger is a fine microplane. For making matchsticks, a mandoline slicer makes short work of it.

Put the lemon pieces, lemon juice, water, grated ginger, and ginger matchsticks in a pot and simmer until the lemons start to soften. Add the sugar. Stir regularly and cook to the desired consistency. To test consistency, put a spoonful on a plate in the fridge. If it’s too runny after cooling for a few minutes, keep simmering and test again after a few minutes.

Makes about four pints. If you want to can it for longer storage, Ball has a nice introduction to canning on their website.


Other fruit preserves from the Play with your food archives:

by Lenore Edman at March 22, 2018 08:44 PM

one girl's diary of improvisational engineering

scanlime029 – Bad Gear

A winch gear split, taking a closer look and failing to repair it. How would you fix this nylon helical gear?

Music for this episode is “パワーポイント” (Power Point) by Anonymous420, available under a CC0 1.0 Universal license.

Please consider supporting me on Patreon so I can keep making these vids!

I’m also trying out Liberapay as an alternative to Patreon, if you’d like to check that out instead:

If you’d like some of those cool scanlime stickers or Servo AF stream gear, check out the shop.

You can find all of the source code and CAD models for this project on GitHub.

For previous episodes, check out the full scanlime playlist.

Each episode is compiled together from many livestreams which you can hang out with on the companion scanlime-in-progress channel.

Follow @scanlimelive for live streaming announcements.

by Micah Scott at March 22, 2018 03:08 AM

March 14, 2018

adafruit industries blog

Researchers from University of Tokyo & Dai Nippon Printing Develop Wearable E-Skin Sensors and Displays Using Micro LEDs | #WearableWednesday

A new ultrathin, elastic display that fits snugly on the skin can show the moving waveform of an electrocardiogram recorded by a breathable, on-skin electrode sensor. Combined with a wireless communication module, this integrated biomedical sensor system – called “skin electronics” – can transmit biometric data to the cloud.

This latest research by a Japanese academic-industrial collaboration, led by Professor Takao Someya at the University of Tokyo’s Graduate School of Engineering, is slated for a news briefing and talk at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas on February 17th.

Thanks to advances in semiconductor technology, wearable devices can now monitor health by first measuring vital signs or taking an electrocardiogram, and then transmitting the data wirelessly to a smartphone. The readings or electrocardiogram waveforms can be displayed on the screen in real time, or sent to either the cloud or a memory device where the information is stored.


 
Read more here, h/t engadget for the story.


Flora breadboard is Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!

by nicknormal at March 14, 2018 03:35 PM

February 26, 2018

mightyOhm

Mike and Key ARC Flea Market, Sat. Mar 10, Puyallup, WA

The 37th annual Mike and Key ARC Electronics Show and Flea Market is just under two weeks away.

I have no affiliation with Mike and Key, but in my opinion this is the best electronics swap meet in the greater Seattle area. I go every year. (If you know of others, post in the comments!)

The Mike and Key flea market will take place on Saturday, March 10th at the Washington State Fairgrounds in Puyallup. Doors open at 9AM (earlier for sellers). I’m looking forward to meeting other PNW electronics and ham radio folks there. I have a seller table again this year so I should be pretty easy to find. I’ll be selling a few kits along with ham radio gear and miscellaneous electronics.

Mike and Key hosts ham radio exams during the swap meet, so if you’re interested in getting a ham radio license this is one opportunity. More details on the event flyer.

More info.

by Jeff at February 26, 2018 07:09 PM

January 29, 2018

mightyOhm

Schrödinger’s Martini: Geiger Counter as mixologist

Photo: Lenore Edman

Josh Meyer and Jonathan Foote created this scintillating cocktail robot for Barbot 2013. They also exhibited it at the DNA Lounge Cocktail Robotics Grand Challenge last July.

A MightyOhm Geiger Counter samples radioactive decay from a martini glass that contains a small amount of uranium. If the number of clicks in a set period is even, the robot dispenses vermouth into the glass. If the count is odd, it dispenses gin, therefore creating a wet or dry martini based on the random process of radioactive decay.

by Jeff at January 29, 2018 06:43 PM

January 22, 2018

uC Hobby

$5.00 Buck/Boost Power Supply Module from China

A quick look at a power supply module I recently picked up from China via eBay.  Listed as: “DC-DC Step Up Down Boost buck Voltage Converter Module LM2577S LM2596S Power N2” at a price of $3.20+$1.85 shipping.  Input 4-35V, Output Adjustable from 1.25 to 25V. Current adjustable 0 to 2Amps.  There are three 10-turn adjustments for […]

by uCHobby at January 22, 2018 07:00 AM

January 19, 2018

NYC Resistor

Fireflies: camera-based musical instruments

camera-based instrument in concert

We asked Adelle and Matt about their camera-based musical instruments. Here’s what they said.

What’s a camera-based musical instrument?  Basically, it’s two cameras facing upwards, about a foot below a player’s hands.  When they move their hand, it’s converted into different types of notes, sound effects and volumes, to create an expressive performance.

Three fireflies under construction

We made 3 of these.  The form was shaped like a musical soundwave: we prototyped it on the laser cutter, and eventually got it CNC milled.

This is part of the CES Intel Keynote pre-show performance. It was the opening of the show, to show off the instruments’ nuance and control before the concert gets too big. The middle instrument was piano sounds; the one on the right was synths and electronics; the one on the left was chords and atmosphere. The show opened dark: the performer, Kevin Doucette, used his hands to bring up the lights on the instrument as well as the synthesisers, then waved his hands to switch keys on a virtual keyboard.   Kevin played the Killers’ “Are we human or are we dancers?”.

In this instance, the performer is wearing gloves with sensors in them, and is using finger bends to trigger notes.  Yes, it looks like a theramin – but it’s way cooler and has blinkenlights.  But seriously, the LEDs are there to show the musician where they are on the instrument and the types of notes that they’re playing (ed: but they’re still cool).

We built this instrument to use the cameras (they’re good at doing fast hand tracking and depth); we added the LEDs because if you have an invisible instrument you don’t know where you are, and the LEDs give feedback to train your hand in space.

Firefly generations

Here’s the lasercut and CNC versions side by side: here, we’re doing LED tests.

(insides of the camera-based instrument)

Here are the insides: the frame, the LED controller and the acrylic housing around them.  The cameras are Realsense.  There are two programs (developed by Nerdmatics) running on linux in the back end, and TouchDesigner to control the lighting.

Firefly guts

Here are the guts of the instrument

Realsense cameras

Here are the cameras

Camera teardown

And the camera teardown

Come talk to us about this project!

by SJ Terp at January 19, 2018 01:00 PM

January 09, 2018

mightyOhm

January 02, 2018

adafruit industries blog

TOAZ (Transformative Orientation-Aware Zootype) is a 4-Legged Quadrupedal Robot | #robots

Check out the video below to see TOAZ in action – that’s a pretty neat maneuver how it can lay flat and then upright itself, and those ‘spider dance’ moves are pretty wild! The project is available here on GitHub with full parts list here.

TOAZ [ Transformative Orientation-Aware Zootype ] is the world first Open-Source Carbon Fiber Transformable 4-Legs Robot. It is build based on Adafruit Feather Development Platform.

Thanks Iok for sending this in!



by nicknormal at January 02, 2018 04:38 PM

December 19, 2017

adafruit industries blog

8-Bit “Rickrolling” Jingle Strikes Cornell Campus | #prank

You can see the battery (likely a CR2032) and speaker unit in the image above – but there’s no word on the brain of the device. The Cornell Daily Sun reports on someone pranking fellow students with a jingle that we all know and appreciate:

For more than a week, students and staff in at least four campus buildings heard a five-second tune, but couldn’t pinpoint exactly where it was coming from.

Some ignored it. Others questioned if they might be imagining things after one too many all-nighters. Many wondered where the noises, which began around Halloween, were coming from and what was producing them.

“It was driving me crazy all week,” said Fred Cederstrom, a student manager at Temple of Zeus in Klarman Hall.

“Every day, you just got madder and madder,” Patty Dennison ’18 said, recalling that she and others finally became accustomed to the noise that permeated the Statler Hall lounge every 30-or-so minutes.

The eight-bit tune (click here to listen) is a sample of Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up,” and hundreds of students in at least four buildings — Statler, Duffield, Klarman and Gates halls — have been repeatedly “Rickrolled” for more than a week by devices they suspect were placed by a prankster or pranksters.

As soon as Cederstrom recognized the song, he thought, “Oh no. I get it now.”

Read more.

by nicknormal at December 19, 2017 06:37 PM

December 11, 2017

uC Hobby

Bad Desk Lamp + 3D Printing = Cool Camera Mount + Useful hand Magnifier

I recently purchased a hot-air gun + soldering iron station from X-Tronic which came with a desk lamp magnifier.  The desk lamp was not functional so I took it apart to fix.  It was made so poorly, I considered it too dangerous to use.  It went on the scrap pile. Today, I decided to make […]

by uCHobby at December 11, 2017 08:02 AM

December 08, 2017

adafruit industries blog

GEMMA and CircuitPython: Moar guide updates! MOAR!

Adafruit’s new GEMMA M0 wearable microcontroller comes with CircuitPython support fresh from the factory. Plug it into USB and use any text editor to open and edit the “.py” file…it’s just that simple, no IDE to install!

We’re updating most of our “classic” GEMMA guides on the Adafruit Learning System to provide example CircuitPython code for the new board along with the original Arduino sketches, and bringing the latter up-to-date where needed. GEMMA M0 can run either one.

With something like 160 GEMMA-related guides in the Adafruit Learning System, watch for updates in small batches. Here are the latest:


NeoPixel Ring Bangle Bracelet — Wear a bangle of light! Build a charming bracelet from four NeoPixel rings and GEMMA, Adafruit’s tiny wearable electronics platform.


Larson Scanner Shades — A simple cyberpunk/Tronpunk fashion project!


3D Printed NeoPixel Ring Hair Dress — Here’s an elegant wearables project for those really special occasions. A 3D Printed LED Hair Dress, powered by an NeoPixel ring and Gemma, Adafruit’s tiny yet powerful wearables micro-controller.

Logan’s Run Hand Jewel LED — In this guide, you’ll learn how to build a bright glowing light that can be used for cosplay elements, decor and wearables. The circuit and components are fully contained in a 3D printed cylindrical enclosure.

Kaleidoscope Eyes (Trinket-Powered NeoPixel LED Ring Goggles) — Fashion headwear for cyberpunks, steampunks and Daft Punks.

by PhilB at December 08, 2017 11:10 PM

November 24, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – All Things micro:bit

For our final installment of 2017 development board Gift Guides we’re profiling the BBC micro:bit! It’s impossible to not get excited by – and slightly adore – the size and capabilities of the micro:bit. It packs a lot of really useful features into a really interesting form factor. And it really is a wonderful learning tool. We recommend Lesson #0 for simply becoming familiar with this novel board, and when you’re ready for something a bit more challenging check out our Puppet “Text Message” System project. Also be sure to check out our micro:bit category on the blog for all our :bit-related news in one spot!


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.


by nicknormal at November 24, 2017 05:30 AM

November 23, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – Friends of CircuitPython

OK so you’ve worked with our Gemma, Circuit Playground Classic, Trinkets, or Metro boards – mostly because of your past familiarity with the Arduino IDE. But you’ve heard really interesting things about CircuitPython, or MakeCode and the sheer simplicity of coding using drag-and-drop blocks. If only you had some options to dabble between them all, while maintaining consistency with the same form factor you’re accustomed to for your project needs. If only! Welcome to our made-for-CircuitPython line of boards, most of which are also compatible with the Arduino IDE you’re comfortable and familiar with.

That’s right we have flavors of the Gemma, Circuit Playground (Express), Trinket, and Metro all made compatible for use with CircuitPython. “No compiler, linker or IDE required!”


The Circuit Playground Express takes the Classic and ramps it up a notch – including additional sensors, and the previously mentioned CircuitPython and MakeCode support. One of my all-time favorite Circuit Playground projects is this How Tall Is It? project that turns the development board into an inclinometer – for measuring the height of objects from a distance! (This project is also compatible with the Circuit Playground Classic.)
Check it out:


There’s a version of the full-size Metro that carries the ‘M0’ name as well – because at its core is the ATSAMD21G18 chip, an ARM Cortex M0+ processor. To explain all the differences in form and function of this Metro from the ATmega version, check out the Learn Guide Adafruit Metro M0 Express – Designed for CircuitPython.


The Gemma M0 extends our wearables options in ‘express’ territory. Make a classic theremin on a breadboard, hoop earrings, or challenge yourself to learning CircuitPython with our Sheikah Pendant or Clockwork Goggles


Last but not least from the Adafruit family of products, the Trinket M0 brings ARM power to the Trinket form factor! This brings 32x as much flash, 64x as much RAM, and 6x the speed as the ATtiny85-based Trinkets. This lets you perform some pretty amazing feats such as these Charlieplexed LED matrices that you can program some beautiful animations onto using CircuitPython:

Learn more about this project here.


Outside of our own options is the MicroPython pyboard. Read this Learn Guide to learn all about MicroPython specifically – along with our range of MicroPython-compatible Learn Guides for making everything from tachometers to holiday lights, and more!

The pyboard is a compact and powerful electronics development board that runs MicroPython. It connects to your PC over USB, giving you a USB flash drive to save your Python scripts, and a serial Python prompt (a REPL) for instant programming. Requires a micro USB cable, and will work with Windows, Mac and Linux.


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.





by nicknormal at November 23, 2017 05:30 AM

November 22, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – Commute with the Adafruit Metro!

Today we’re profiling our own Metro boards – the full-size and ‘mini’ versions. First up the full-size Metro may look somewhat familiar, at least in terms of form-factor-ness:


 
The size and shape of the Metro is derivative of the Arduino UNO R3, with a few of our own bells and whistles thrown in. Notably those 4 indicator LEDs on the edge of the board between the DC power jack and USB receptacle. Also the device can operate at 3.3V or 5V logic with a simple jumper, and the DC jack even includes a micro on/off switch next to it for easily powering down your project when needed without physically disconnecting the power supply.

The full-size Metro is fully compatible with all our Arduino shields as well. (The version shown above has headers pre-soldered to the board, but we sell a header-less version as well.)

To show what that could possibly translate into, here’s an example from Collin Cunningham upgrading a decades-old 2X-L ‘bot with a Metro, Wave shield, and proto shield to accommodate a LM386 amplifier circuit to give his Echo Dot a new look and feel:


 
Next up is also the Metro, but in Mini form factor!

The Metro Mini comes as a fully assembled and tested board, with bootloader burned in and also a stick of 0.1″ header. Some light soldering is required if you’d like to plug it into a breadboard, or you can solder wires or header directly to the breakout pads. Once headers are installed they can be fitted into 0.6″ wide sockets.

Similar in function but in a different size package is the Metro Mini – at only 18mm x 44mm x 4mm the Mini is truly that, while providing all the power and punch you expect out of the ATmega328 brain. The board can easily be configured for plugging into a breadboard, allowing for rapid prototyping prior to designing your own Metro shield or standalone PCB. The small form factor has a unique look, for example in this Metro Minimalist Clock:


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.


by nicknormal at November 22, 2017 05:30 AM

November 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Biohacking: Learning to See with Sound

There is a software package that has been available since 1992 called “the vOICe“. It allows for sensory substitution creating an audio landscape based on camera images. The primary application for this software is to assist the blind with navigation. However, I can see from a biohacking perspective that “the vOICe” might just fall under the brushing with magic category.  Arthur C. Clarke’s famous quote comes to mind “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic”. Yes, seeing people blind folded that can successful find a table, pick up a fork and serve themselves might just seem like magic to on lookers.

Early home-made setup for The vOICE. Smaller cameras, phones and Raspberry Pi support are making things less awkward.

Here is a summary of the Hardware options to start experimenting with “the vOICe” today:

The above image has a WAV file associated with it so you can hear what the sine wave and block shapes sound like.

Learning the navigation queues:

The good news is that there is an excellent manual with step by step exercises such as picking up blocks on a table while blind folded. The bad news is that this process of hearing where things are needs to be done in baby steps. Just picking up brightly colored blocks from a dark table has a recommended two week training period with 30 minutes a day block practice. Full soundscape navigation fluency is expected to take up to a year.

The voice works in a very predictable way “scans the view from left to right, while associating height with pitch and brightness with loudness. Another way of describing the mapping is that each view is scanned in thin vertical slices, starting with a vertical slice sounding on your left side and ending with a vertical slice sounding on your right side.”

Reading through the manual and attempting to navigate my home with the Droid app required I make some adjustments:

  • Lower the volume – the soundscapes being played are intense and even irritating depending on what is in the current frame. Lower volume helps a lot with absorbing the sounds.
  • Practice Blindfolded
  • Move quickly (when safe to do so) or at least naturally. Moving slow is different experience that has too much thinking involved. The goal is to stop analyzing and become fluent.

by Mikey Sklar at November 20, 2017 09:00 PM

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2017 – Flora, Gemma, and Circuit Playground Classic

All this week we’ll be featuring microcontrollers and development boards as part of our ongoing 2017 Gift Guides!

If you’re looking to get someone interested in a wearables-centric Arduino-compatible platform, Flora is a great place to start. The board is currently in version 3 and is compatible with a smörgåsbord of breakout sensors and modules – including GPS, accelerometer, light sensor, and even a UV index sensor, and more! If you’re curious to see more about those sensors check out the video below and accompanying Flora Sensors Learn Guide for more pictures and descriptions. The Flora book pack is currently out of stock but the standalone book is available so you could still build your own Flora ‘book pack’ for that special someone interested in wearables.


If you’re looking for a wearable solution that’s a bit more discreet, or maybe you only need a few (as in 3) GPIOs, look no further than the Gemma, a small but highly capable device (described in detail – both operationally and with example uses – at this Learn Guide). Measuring only 1″ in diameter, the unit is powered by an ATtiny85 with 8K of flash. Power can be delivered via external battery or USB – and it now even has a micro on/off switch (not shown in following video). Check it out:


Breakout Moment!

Okay so you’re interested in the Flora, but the Gemma is just so darn cute! (And you’ve heard fun things about ATtiny85.) But which one is really for you? Thankfully there’s a video for that! Watch:


OK both the Flora and Gemma look very capable. (Because they are!) But maybe you’re looking for something with just a bit more…zazz! Perhaps a light sensor on-board, oh and a microphone would be swell! And what are the chances of having a small board (I like that round form factor too) with an accelerometer, thermistor, and a bevy of NeoPixels already installed for feedback display or just aesthetics? There’s a board for that! And it looks great too:


 
It’s the Circuit Playground Classic and it contains all the sensors and LEDs previously mentioned and even more! Including pushbuttons, a miniature speaker, and capacitive-capable inputs. At 2″ round, this board packs a punch and is even cheaper than a standard Arduino – WOW!

To give you an example of the touch-and-sound capabilities of the Circuit Playground Classic check out this Star Trek combadge; and to see an example of the feedback from NeoPixels check out this electronic D6 dice project (that uses the accelerometer to detect a ‘roll’).


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Tune into the Adafruit Blog for six weeks of hand picked Adafruit Holiday Gift Guides featuring Adafruit products, projects and more starting Monday November 13.

Still not sure if you’re on the right gift giving track? Gift Certificates are the perfect cyber-present for the electronics geek in your life and are available at any time. When in doubt contact us!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of October 9th, 2017 12:00 PM ET we are offering a number of free products for orders starting at $99 or more!

For orders of $99 or more – a free Adafruit Perma-proto half-size breadboard

For orders of $149 or more – a free Adafruit Trinket M0

For orders of $200 or more – free UPS ground shipping (*Continental USA only)

For orders of $249 or more – a free Adafruit Gemma M0

For orders of $299 or more – a free Adafruit Circuit Playground Express

If you love CircuitPython, then you’ll love this promotion! The Trinket M0, GEMMA M0, and Circuit Playground Express are all great boards for getting going with CircuitPython.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2017

Here are your 2017 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control. Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for DHL, UPS or USPS.

Monday, Dec. 25, 2017, Christmas, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, no DHL, UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Domestic Orders

UPS Ground: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

UPS 3 Day: Place orders by Thursday 11 am ET – December 14, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

UPS 2 Day: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 15, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017

UPS Next Day: Place orders by Monday 11 am ET – December 18, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS First Class and USPS Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 8, 2017 – Arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First Class Mail International: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2017. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/22/2017.

USPS Express Mail International: Place orders by Friday – December 1, 2017. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/22/2017 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.

DHL EXPRESS WORLDWIDE: Place orders by Friday 11 am ET – December 8, 2017 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 22, 2017.



by nicknormal at November 20, 2017 05:30 AM

November 14, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Make Robot Puppy, Not Robot Enemy: Boston Dynamics’ Latest Robot Dog

via The Verge

Robot maker Boston Dynamics, now owned by Japanese telecom and tech giant SoftBank, just published a short YouTube clip featuring a new, more advanced version of its SpotMini robot. SpotMini, first unveiled in June 2016, started out as a giraffe-looking chore bot that was pretty terrible at performing tasks around the house, and, in one short clip, hilariously ate it on a cluster of banana peels like a character straight out of a slapstick cartoon.

The new SpotMini looks much more polished and less grotesque, like a real-life cross between a Pixar animation and a robot out of a Neill Blomkamp vision of the future, thanks in part to series of bright yellow plates covering its legs and body. The new bot’s movement also looks incredibly fluid. It shows just how much progress Boston Dynamics is making on its goal of life-like, animal-inspired robots that can move and respond to the forces in the real world.

See more!

by Zay at November 14, 2017 08:00 AM

October 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Animated ‘Snake Eyes’ Embedded in Day of the Dead Print | #ElectronicHalloween #RaspberryPi #piday

Thanks to educator Kristoffer for sending us images – and video! below – of his snake eyes bonnet with accompanying displays attached to a Raspberry Pi 3, displaying two eyes embedded inside a Day of the Dead print, itself inside a coffin-shaped frame. What a clever way to embed some moving eyes!


Adafruit electronic halloween dark HAPPY HALLOWEEN! Every weekday this month we’ll be bringing you ideas and projects for an Electronic Halloween! Expect wearables, hacks & mods, costumes and more here on the Adafruit blog! Working on a project for Halloween this year? Share it with us on Google+, in the comments below, the Adafruit forums, Facebook, Instagram or Twitter— we’d love to see what you’re up to and share it with the world (tag your posts #ElectronicHalloween). You can also send us a blog tip! Tune in to our live shows, 3D hangouts with Noe and Pedro and Ask an Engineer, featuring store discount codes, ideas for projects, costumes, decorations, and more!

by nicknormal at October 20, 2017 03:18 PM

September 27, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Seen at #MakerFaire: ‘Some Cool Stuff!’ – Specifically a DIY Kaleidoscope – by Randy Sarafan

Instructables Design Studio founder Randy Sarafan had a few projects on display at the recent World Maker Faire. He was showing some of his well-known robotics projects but the one that really caught my eye was his homemade kaleidoscope with a clamping mechanism for holding your cameraphone steady after you position the camera’s lens against the viewing receptacle (shown below) of the kaleidoscope:

A small motor could turn the kaleidoscope, or alternatively you could point it at something which itself is moving (such as images on a screen). The clamping mechanism allows you to record video or take stills of kaleidoscopic images like so:

See more of Randy’s projects here on his website.

by nicknormal at September 27, 2017 11:24 AM

July 28, 2017

todbot blog

ILOVELAMP: my Supplyframe DesignLab residency project

For four months this year I had a residency at the Supplyframe DesignLab.  I worked on “ILOVELAMP“, a project experimenting with creating lamps with configurable light emitting surfaces using addressable LED strips. Check out the project: https://hackaday.io/project/20121-i-love-lamp

by todbot at July 28, 2017 05:55 PM

July 09, 2017

todbot blog

Replacing the battery in a Macbook Pro Retina (late 2013)

I really like the generation previous to the current Macbook Pros. You know the ones. They had all the useful ports like USB-A, HDMI, an SD Card slot, and MagSafe!  And it had a long-lived battery in a thin case. That is my Macbook Pro. And it’s wonderful. But now 3.5 years on, the once [...]

by todbot at July 09, 2017 02:31 AM

May 23, 2017

DorkbotPDX

Monolith Synth

Monolith Synth paul Tue, 2017-05-23 12:06

Over the last several weeks I collaborated with Ben Davis, Darcy Neal and Ross Fish on this Monolith Synth interactive sculpture we took to Tested and Maker Faire.

This was a pretty typical usage scene at Maker Faire:

A post shared by Darcy Neal (@drc3p0) on

This crazy adventure started with Kickstarter reached out to me, only 6 weeks before Maker Faire, looking to showcase 4 successful projects in their booth. They wanted to show "creative tools" and how people used them. So I reached out to a few synthesizer folks I've met and who've used Teensy. They also suggested bringing it to Tested to make a video. So it began...

From the beginning I had a step sequencer using illuminated arcade buttons in mind. So I quickly designed this little I/O expander board and sent it off to OSH Park's Super-Swift service.

The whole project came together over just 4 weeks. Our first meetup was just to discuss what to build, followed a week later by our first build night. By then the I/O expander boards had arrived. We made not the final Monolith, but 3 breadboard prototypes, so the software development side could begin!

Another meetup focused only on software. Almost all the software was developed on these prototype panels.

In this picture you can also see the panel layout sketches on the notepad on the right side, and a blue tape model underneath on the table, which we made to get an idea of the overall size.

Ross and Darcy had synthesis plans that needed a signal-controlled PWM waveform and improvements to the envelope feature, so I worked on improvements to the Teensy Audio Library while they wrote the Arduino sketch code.

The day before our next meetup, I started turning those sketches into a design for the laser cutting. I made this 1/4 scale model of the front and side pieces. At this point, none of the back side or interior ribs (for strength) had been designed, and you can see the model lacks the many holes for screws & brackets which joined everything.

Only 2 weeks before Maker Faire we had an epic 13-hour build day where all the final parts were laser cut and assembled. Here's a photo of Darcy & Ben putting the panels together on my kitchen counter!

All the clear acrylic plastic parts were completely drawn, with all mounting holes, and made that day.

Here's the complete layout of all parts (mk2017_design):

Here's a large high-res copy of this image, and a big ZIP file with all the original Corel Draw files for anyone who wishes to try making their own.

While the laser did most fabrication work, other steps like countersinking for the potentiometers were needed. It was indeed an epic 13 hour day of making.

A couple days later, I spent a whole day completing the wiring we couldn't get done in those 13 hours. Erin Murphy (the "Soldering Goddess" at PJRC) put in a few hours on aesthetic improvements to the messy tangle of wires from so many buttons.

Just a few days later we had our last "build" session, to get the 3 separately written Arduino sketches merged and working together as one integrated project. Even though everything has been designed to go together, this session went very late. Ben did much of the heavy lifting to merge the 3 programs.

This is the final audio DSP system settled upon that late night.

Here's a large high-res copy of this image.

This was the first actual usage of the Monolith, well past 1am when we finally had it all up and running.

The next day I took it all apart and packed all the pieces and spare parts into these 2 big boxes, weighing in at 55 and 40 pounds!

This is the first time I've ever shipped a project to Maker Faire, rather than driving a truck or hauling cases of checked baggage on a plane. So much easier, and it allowed time to work on a nice handout card. After some back and forth with the others and last-minute proof reading by Robin, who caught what would have been embarrassing typos and grammatical errors, we sent this card off to be fast-turn printed.


Here is a printable PDF file for the front side.


Here is a printable PDF file for the back side.

Darcy and I flew to San Francisco early and spent the day with Tested, putting it back together while they shot that awesome video. Sometime I hope to have even 1/10th that sort of video production skill.

Since it was already put together, we had little to do setup-wise. Friday morning Ben, Ross and Darcy did some adjustments of the sound levels which really made it come to life in the space. For anyone who wishes to dig deeper into the technical details, thecomplete source code is available on Github.

All weekend long people really enjoyed playing with it. There were many really awesome moments, like this one:

Here is Kickstarter's coverage of the event. Scroll down a bit to the part about Teensy. :)

During the 3 days of Maker Faire, things went very well. We did experience a couple minor issues. Massive electrical noise from so many other projects played havoc with the capacitive touch sensing. Saturday evening I rewrote the code to look for changes from an average rather than just an increase from a threshold, which allowed it to usually work well enough. The other tech issue was a bass. When turned up louder, the bass notes would shake all the plastic panels, rattling screws and even some of the connectors loose at time. Easy to fix.

Towards the end of Sunday, the Maker Faire folks came around and gave up an award. At first I shrugged it off, since they've done the same for other stuff I've brought in prior years. But those were the blue ribbons. Apparently the only hand out one of these red one each in "zone". They said it's a big deal...

Really, the best thing about this year was working with a great team. Ross, Darcy and Ben really stepped up and did a great job on so many parts.

by paul at May 23, 2017 06:06 PM

May 22, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Circuit Playground Bike Glove Light and Custom FLORA PCB with Compass

Thanks Lim for participating in last week’s Show-and-Tell and also for sending in these higher resolution stills and video showing off his projects!

Here’s a video showing the shake-n-glow activation of the bike glove – one shake to turn it on, another to switch off the LEDs:

Very cool!

And here’s a close-up of Lim’s custom FLORA-based PCB with compass in lieu of the WS2812 LED:

Here’s Lim’s original broadcast on last week’s Show-and-Tell:


Featured Adafruit Products!

NewImage

Circuit Playground – Developer Edition: Circuit Playground features an ATmega32u4 processor, just like our popular Flora. The board’s also round and has alligator-clip pads around it so you don’t have to solder or sew to make it work. You can power it from USB, a AAA battery pack, or with a Lipoly battery (for advanced users). Just program your code into the board then take it on the go! Read more.

NewImage

FLORA – Wearable electronic platform: Arduino-compatible – v3: FLORA is Adafruit’s fully-featured wearable electronics platform. It’s a round, sewable, Arduino-compatible microcontroller designed to empower amazing wearables projects.FLORA comes with Adafruit’s support, tutorials and projects. Check out dozens of FLORA tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System, with more added all the time! Read more.

by nicknormal at May 22, 2017 05:37 PM

May 08, 2017

DorkbotPDX

DOBOHEBOCON RESULTS

DOBOHEBOCON RESULTS skinny Mon, 2017-05-08 14:56

The first DorkbotPDX Hebocon had some fierce competitors.  Check below for video and results!

DorkbotPDX DOBOHEBOCON 2017 from Brian Richardson on Vimeo.

Results:

Champion: Popcorn by Gary and Daniel

Gary and Daniel

Their bot has an actual piece of Popcorn in it.

Popcorn in bot!

Technically Poorest: Spring Thing by Drew

Spring Thing

This might be my favorite.  No electricity, just a spring.  

Fastest Fail: Lithium by Bill

Lithium

Lithium was a pro looking bot!

Poorest Quality: Spitter Bot by Mathew

Spitter Bot

Spitter Bot spit 3d printing filament at its foes!

Loudest: Just One Bugfix by Brian

Just One Bugfix

Just One Bugfix played an intimidating scream as it competed.

by skinny at May 08, 2017 08:56 PM

April 19, 2017

DorkbotPDX

DOBOHEBOCON

DOBOHEBOCON skinny Tue, 2017-04-18 21:41

Working rules link here

by skinny at April 19, 2017 03:41 AM

April 17, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Pictures from the 10th Anniversary ‘OptoSonic Tea’ in NYC

Last week marked the 10th anniversary (wow has it really been 10 years – yes, yes it has) in NYC for OptoSonic Tea – think tea, like steeped, or immersion in, with opto like ocular and sonic like aural envelopes of experience (that said at non-anniversary events conversations usually take place around servings of green tea). Projections and light-based works were more obvious: this image is coming from that lens, with mixing or multi-layered visuals being common. Audio was immersive, and random; speakers were scattered throughout the multi-thousand square foot Pioneer Works in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and sometimes (if not most times) the person you could closest find doing audio mixing wasn’t producing the sounds you were necessarily hearing at any moment. Their sound might be elsewhere, or even delayed.

More than three dozen artists and makers participated, and here are some shots from the celebratory evening:


The main hall of Pioneer Works



Co-organizer Katherine Liberovskaya tends to her mixing station; projection seen above on the architecture of the space.




These rad projectors are housed in unique flip-lid cases; the maker was using analog 35mm slides mixed through some digital software (seen above).


Great sounds from this homemade slide guitar instrument – give a listen:


Old school! The heat coming off this bellows-based projector was intense!



This guy had some sort of kaleidoscopic laser gun – seen on the wall. His left hand went into some sort of ‘pouch’ that somehow controlled elements of the projection:


Stay Puft everyone!


Also here’s a nice timelapse of the work by Chris Jordan that I managed to not get a photo of. However this video shows the work even better than I could have documented and also timelapses the amazing effort artists put into their installations:


And here’s the complete list of participating artists from the OptoSonic Tea: 10th Anniversary event:

Gill Arno
Miah Artola
Bob Bellerue
Causings
CHIKA
Tom Chiu
Seth Cluett
Thomas Dexter
Jeff Donaldson
Luke DuBois
Bradley Eros
Michael Evans
David First
Kit Fitzgerald
Richard Garet
Shelley Hirsch
Chris Jordan
Antonia Kuo
Andrew Lampert
Katherine Liberovskaya
Al Margolis
Anthony Martin
Miya Masaoka
Brock Monroe
Charlie Morrow
Dafna Naphtali
Bradford Reed
Ursula Scherrer
Joel Schlemowitz
Lary 7
Lily Sheng
Jeremy Slater
George Stadnik
Hans Tammen
Ben Vida
Stephen Vitiello
Philip White
Amnon Slater
Sonia Yuditskaya

by nicknormal at April 17, 2017 05:37 PM

April 13, 2017

adafruit industries blog

‘Bionic Handling Assistant’ by Festo Inspired by Nature | @roboweek #NationalRoboticsWeek #RoboWeek

Festo have been working on some 21st century production robot arms, inspired by nature. Specifically elephant trunks, and fish tail fins. Festo have additional information, videos, and photos of the unit here on their website, and you can watch the video below here on PBS Learning Media where David Pogue gets a unique look at the labs working on this new tech.


 

Learn how one company took inspiration from nature to reinvent the robotic arm in this video excerpted from NOVA: “Making Stuff Wilder.” Host and technology columnist David Pogue meets with engineer Heinrich Frontzek to find out about the Bionic Handling Assistant—a machine modeled after an elephant’s trunk. A traditional robotic arm is rigid and unable to work closely with humans, but this new design is more flexible and less dangerous. The company has also developed a new kind of adaptive gripper, inspired by fish fins, that is flexible and able to securely grasp even fragile objects, like eggs.

Read more here and here.

by nicknormal at April 13, 2017 04:30 AM

March 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

NEW GUIDE: Toy Car Speed Timer #AdafruitLearningSystem #3DPrinting

Find out how fast your toy car is.

Use two pairs of IR break beam sensors and some 3D-printing skill to build a Toy Car Speed Timer block to adjoin to your 1/64 scale toy race car track! A Feather M0 Basic calculates the difference in time between the two breaks in the pairs of IR sensors and displays the value on an OLED display. The unit is battery powered so it can be switched on and off quickly without running a main power line to the circuit for use in your track design.

See the full guide here!


 
Here’s a sample of the code:

See the full guide here!

by nicknormal at March 20, 2017 06:29 PM

March 03, 2017

Arduino Blog

Need desk lighting? How about 1,200+ LEDs?

After he’d just finished a project using RGB LEDs, Imgur user nolobot’s brother mentioned he needed a new computer desk. Most people would probably just let their brother buy one, others would make something out of wood, but nolobot instead decided to create something truly amazing using more than 1,200 WS2812 RGB LED modules, an Arduino Mega, aluminum extrusion, and translucent polycarbonate.

The Mega controls these LEDs with the FastLED library, which are sandwiched between a base piece of plywood and a strip of polycarbonate using custom spacers. This diffuses the light nicely, allowing for beautiful light animations directly on the desk’s surface.

You can find more on this awesome build on the project’s Imgur page!

by Arduino Team at March 03, 2017 04:33 PM

February 24, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Demo for Slung Load Controller Using #RaspberryPi + naze32 | #piday

After showing what is possible with drone position controlling, Aldo Vargas is back with another drone project, demonstrating compensation for underslung loads. Think of Chinook helicopters transporting Humvees or helicopters carrying sand or water for dousing forest fires. Those maneuvers come with great degree of skill, and learning – operated by humans with years of training, performing moves not typical for commercial drone applications. Which is only to say someone then will figure it out, for drones! The comparison photos, GIF, and video below show what is possible with this controller software.

Multirotor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (MRUAV) have become an increasingly interesting area of study in the past decade, becoming tools that allow for positive changes in today’s world. Not having an on-board pilot means that the MRUAV must contain advanced on- board autonomous capabilities and operate with varying degrees of autonomy. One of the most common applications for this type of aircraft is the transport of goods. Such applications require low-altitude flights with hovering and vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capabilities.

Similar as before in this project we use the AltaX Flight Stack which is compromised by a Raspberry Pi 3 as companion computer and a naze32 as flight controller.

The slung load controller and the machine learning estimator is running on the RPI3, although of course the training of the recurrent neural network was done offline in a big desktop computer. The RPI calculates the next vehicle position based on the estimation of the position of the slung load, everything is running using our framework DronePilot and guess what? its open source ;). Keep reading for more details.

The results? Pretty remarkable. Here’s a side-by-side comparison of an underslung loaded drone without and with the controller running:

And here are timelapse photos showing the drone without the load controller:

And here’s that same load while compensated using the load controller:

Wow! That is a difference!

Vargas walks through the setup in the video below, and you can read a bit more here on his blog:


 
Read more.

by nicknormal at February 24, 2017 02:37 PM

February 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

‘Variant: Limits’ is Like Myst for Calculus Students – Explore a 3D World, Solve Puzzles with Calculus! | @Triseum

This. Looks. Amazing!

Triseum have announced a “third-person exploration game based on calculus” called Variant. While the gameplay is clearly different from Myst (3rd person perspective, rotational 3D world), the trailer (below) does remind me of moments from that breakthrough game, solving puzzles to advance through a curious world – how did this architecture get here? Who built this place? Who maintains these grounds? And yeah, you get to learn calculus along the way!

 
Watch the complete trailer:

Triseum are accepting applications from “selected institutions and educators” for “a sponsored pilot in spring 2017 to bring the ultimate in game-based learning experiences to your calculus students.” If you’re interested you can read more and apply for the pilot here – and I do hope this gets released to the general public, and I’m sure I’m not the only one interested in re-learning calculus knowledge through immersive gameplay!

by nicknormal at February 20, 2017 02:11 PM

February 07, 2017

todbot blog

Learning Fusion 360 via 3d-printed iPhone tripod mounts

Here’s how I taught myself Fusion360 by updating a 3d-printable iPhone tripod mount I found on Thingiverse, and put the update back on Thingiverse. Several years ago, I needed a tripod mount for my iPhone, so like anyone with a 3d printer at the time, I headed to Thingiverse and found this awesome tripod mount [...]

by todbot at February 07, 2017 11:58 PM

January 20, 2017

adafruit industries blog

Little Tike Cozy Coupe Upgraded with Arduino Uno, Wave Shield for Custom Sound Interactions

Brentmore Labs took to upgrading his BMW-hooded Little Tike Cozy Coupe with some custom electronics, adding sound effects and replacing some elements along the way and even doing some custom 3D-printing where replacing plastic parts was required. In short, AMAZING! Check out the video below to hear one of the sound effects, and read more about – including looking at the code running this project – here.

The Little Tike Cozy Coupe, a children’s classic made of soft hollow plastic (LPDE), is a blank canvas for tinkering and customization. While the car comes with some entertainment options, such a squeaker in the horn, I think that my client deserves something a little more realistic and, of course, high-tech.

This wasn’t a particularly difficult project, but it did take a bit of time to set up. The overall concept is to create a media controller which plays different sounds depending on the button pressed. I figured I could replace the toy key with a giant button and also fill the blank space on the left with some buttons to select the music.


 
Read more here.


Featured Adafruit Products!

NewImage

Rugged Metal Pushbutton with Blue LED Ring – 16mm Blue Momentary: These chrome-plated metal buttons are rugged and look real good while doing it! Simply drill a 16mm hole into any material up to 1/2″ thick and you can fit these in place, there’s even a rubber gasket to keep water out of the enclosure. On the front of the button is a flat metal actuator, surrounded by a blue plastic LED ring. Read more.

by nicknormal at January 20, 2017 02:11 PM

January 12, 2017

SparkFun Electronics News

Enginursday: Voltage Regulator Temperature Mobile App

When a design needs an inexpensive, simple and low-ripple voltage supply, a great choice is a linear regulator. These benefits come mostly at the cost of efficiency, which is lost in the form of heat. How does one know if a simple linear regulator can safely operate in a system, how much power is wasted, or how much heat needs to be managed? We’ve created a simple tool that calculates this information for you.

Model of a Linear Voltage Regulator

High level model of linear regulator

Figure 1: High-level model of linear regulator

Figure 1 shows a high-level model of a linear regulator. It consists of a resistive pass element that is controlled by some logic to keep the output voltage at the desired value. At this level only three values are really needed to feed the model and get values for power lost and heat generated: the input supply voltage, the desired output voltage and the current being drawn by the load. That’s all that is required to determine values to necessary precision.

In reality, the pass element isn’t normally a potentiometer as shown, and the control logic is more than a magic box.

More Detailed Conceptual Model

Figure 2: More detailed conceptual model (Courtesy of Linear Technology)

A possible actual implementation uses an error amplifier to sense the output voltage of a voltage divider. The error is the difference between the scaled voltage and a precision reference. The error feeds the base of a bipolar or gate of a field effect transistor in their linear regions. The current through the divider and into the amplifier is known and can be accounted for.

The model used by this application assumes that the power used by the control logic is negligible. In reality, I’ve seen values as low as 1.5µA. Other regulators use on the order of 10’s of µAs. A low quiescent current of 10µA is only 1 percent error when drawing a single mA. Typical use cases are often in the multiple mA range and up. Since the power used by the logic is negligible, the current in is equal to the current out and only needs to be set once. The extra voltage is lost in the form of heat in the power transistor.

Regulator Specifications

The app comes with some typical values for a generic linear regulator already set. This is great for playing around and estimating, but for real applications the actual manufacturer specifications should be used. These may be tricky to find, but the best place to look is in the manufacturer’s datasheet for the part.

Example regulator specifications

Figure 3: Example regulator specifications from datasheet (Courtesy of Maxim Integrated)

The key specs to look for are the maximum junction temperature and the thermal resistance. The resistance varies from package to package and the thermal mass of whatever the regulator is touching. For this example we will take a common use case of a regulator without forced cooling and without a heat sink attached to a four-layer PCB. The datasheet shows this thermal resistance (θJA) between the junction to ambient to be 42°CW.

There are at least three values listed for maximum temperature. The part is rated to operate over the -40°C to +125°C automotive temperature range. That’s not relevant to this math. The maximum junction temperature is spec’d to be +150°C. We can verify that this is a good value since later in the datasheet it is stated that the device will go into thermal shutdown at +165°C. That’s a state to definitely avoid, so there is a little margin.

Using the Application

Example regulator specifications set

Figure 4: Setting example specs

Maximum current allowed example

Figure 5: Determining maximum current allowed

At the top of the app is the familiar hamburger menu that slides the settings out from the left side. Figure 4 shows the thermal resistance of 42°CW and the max junction temperature of +150°C entered. This example uses the default ambient temperature of +25°C. Swiping the settings back to the left hides them. The input voltage was arbitrarily chosen to be 12V, and the output to be 5V. The current slider was wiggled until it was right around the point where JUNCTION TEMP: XY.Z°C label turned red (@ 150°C) and fine-tuned with the steppers to the maximum point where the label wasn’t red. This turns out to be 0.425A, which is wasting nearly 3W of power.

Tips

If you live in ‘Murica you are probably more comfortable with temperature units of degrees Fahrenheit. There is a setting to change the units to °F. Touch the gray Fahrenheit (°F) label. It should turn green, indicating the change has been made. Only the thermal resistance will remain in the units most of the world use (°CW) since we aren’t sure where to find those values in other units (°F·sft·lbf?).

The default ranges of the sliders cover a fairly large range that should work for many cases. If the parameters for a project are outside of these ranges, then the bottom section of the settings is provided as a way to fix that. There might be cases where one wants a clean 200A supply of 24V. Feeding up to ~24.021739V into a magic LDO, that range can be set. Many designs may lie in a narrow range. The parameter ranges can be tightened up to make finer tuning easier. The range of the slider is discretized because there are only so many pixels on a screen. If a value cannot be set with the slider, narrow the range or use the steppers next to the sliders to fine-tune the value.

For back-of-the-envelope type calculations, wiggle the slider near the desired value. If nothing turns red, then the application is nice and safe.

Advanced Use and Hacks

The first hack allows typing in the desired voltages and/or current to great precision. The trick is to set the desired value as the min or max for a slider setting. After that, simply swipe all the way to that extreme, and the exact value is set.

Example regulator specifications set

Figure 6: Setting exact values as slider extremes

Maximum current allowed example

Figure 7: Using those typed-in values

The precision of the inputs on the UI is limited to 10mV and 1mA steps, but the math isn’t. To come up with eight significant digits in the last section, a minute or two was spent using this hack to get that value (which is likely poor using only a simple linear model with the used assumptions).

alt text

Figure 8: Excessive precision

Another ‘hack’ is too use ‘fake’ values for the thermal resistance to model heat sinks and other configurations. Sum the thermal resistances of the regulator, the junction between it and a heat sink, and that of the heat sink.

Where to Score

Want your own copy? It’s free in the Google Play Store and the iTunes App Store.

Hate something about the app? Go fork yourself a copy and change it!

Have an idea for another app? No promises, but feel free to share your idea in the comments below.

Bonus

For those who have never put a mobile app into one of the marketplaces, here is an interesting clip. The following is Google’s automated testing getting an older build to crash. Interesting use of the app, but it worked to find a flaw! Both Apple and Google run tests like these when a new version is uploaded.

Fun clip of Android version crashing during development

comments | comment feed

by SparkFun Electronics at January 12, 2017 03:30 PM

December 18, 2016

uC Hobby

AA Battery Pack to 3.3V for IoT Projects

I tweeted about my experiments with the AAT1217 switching supply controller a few days ago.  I found the chip in a product design I was evaluating. It looked like a great answer to the power problem in an IoT project I’m working on.  I ordered a few from Mouser and some breakout boards to try.  […]

by uCHobby at December 18, 2016 12:32 AM

December 08, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Adafruit Holiday Gift Guide 2016: BeagleBone Black Products & Projects

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The BeagleBone Black is a lil’ Linux-powered single-board computer whose curved corners allow it to fit snugly inside a mint tin 😉 The ‘Bone has a capable array of GPIOs, PWMs, analog inputs, along with I2C, SPI, and the highly-reliable low-latency PRUs (Programmable Real-time Units, powered by two 32-bit 200MHz built-in microcontrollers!), among other features and capabilities. Below we’ve rounded up everything from getting started with to peripherals to some projects that use the ‘Bone:


The Essentials

5V 2A (2000mA) switching power supply – UL Listed

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OK first things first and with the BeagleBone Black that means a dedicated power supply. This wall wart supply of 2000mAh is sufficient if not ideal. Long-story short you don’t want to power the BeagleBone Black over USB if you plan on conducting any WiFi activity (see adapter, below) or driving any project where the power draw might spike. Get a good power supply, and you’ll be good too! This wart is relatively small for the punch it packs with plugs in the orientation I prefer for most of my project installs.


USB WiFi (802.11b/g/n) Module with Antenna

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Not as discreet as other WiFi modules on the market – but personally I dig the articulating antenna that I can somewhat point in the optimal direction (and yes things like this do actually matter, like, a lot) for my installation.


From Prototype to Project

Adafruit Proto Plate for Beagle Bone & Beagle Bone Black

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For any board, you’ll likely want to begin with a breadboard setup, and proto plates are not only a great way to house a breadboard alongside whatever board you’re working with but allow easy pickup-and-go transport of the prototyping to any new location.


Adafruit Proto Cape Kit for Beagle Bone & Beagle Bone Black

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When you’re ready to make your prototyping layout a little more permanent – and perhaps reclaim your breadboard – consider migrating everything to this Beagle Bone Proto. It doesn’t contain as much prototyping real estate as a breadboard, and will require a nominal amount of soldering, but it looks great and will make nice and tidy your custom through-hole component circuit for your BeagleBone Black.


Anidees BeagleBoneBlack Case – Silver Aluminum with Crystal Top

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And when you’re ready to go full-enclosure, for install either at your workstation or in an environment where the ‘Bone can be placed and left alone, this aluminum-finished enclosure looks fantastic. There’s room inside to house your Beagle Bone Proto as well – although not necessarily the components on top, that all depends on your design and layout. The clear top allows easy viewing of the board or any display or indicator LEDs you might have installed.

And of course if you like this sleek case but want it a bit more stealth-looking, check out this black version. 😉


Projects

Blinking an LED with BeagleBone Black

‘LED blink’ is basically the ‘hello world‘ of any single-board computer project – and this 15-minute project will have you going ‘Aha!’ when you’re done with how easy and intuitive the ‘Bone can be. After this you’ll no doubt want to explore other simple how-tos like measuring temperature or measuring light values – then you’ll be ready for more sophisticated motor control or capsense projects.


LedGames – a BeagleBone Black 64×64 LED Game

Not exactly a simple project, this build will test your fabrication, soldering, and software skillz. But the result is a fantastic-looking 64×64 retro gaming station LedGames!


Dirty Dish Detector

 
My own little claim to fame is this ‘Bone- and OpenCV-powered project I built alongside Jason Kridner called the Dirty Dish Detector. The hardware is relatively plug-n-play, however it will involve some navigation of the command line, as well as Cloud9 which is a brilliant built-in cloud development solution for ‘Bone builds!

Does your makerspace have a sink that is always full of dirty dishes? Or do you yourself require better discipline around the home to stay on top of your chores? To automate your home, office, or workshop, one of the first things you’ll require is some kind of vision system to detect motion or objects. A small computer capable of running OpenCV could be just the tool you need.

The Dirty Dish Detector combines a BeagleBone Black & Logitech webcam – along with plenty of open-source software – to tackle the annoying activity of tracking when dishes get left in the sink.


Footer

We’re excited for the Holiday Season here at Adafruit, and we can’t wait to share that excitement with you! Stay tuned into the blog where you will find new, handpicked gift guides five days a week from November 7 through December 23rd, 2016 alongside holiday themed tutorials and builds!


Free Deals

Adafruit offers exciting deals and free items when you shop with us.

As of November 21st, 2016 1:00 PM ET we are currently offering:

ONE FREE LIMITED EDITION ENAMEL PIN for orders $99 or more. Some restrictions apply. There are currently three unique pins available as free items. While we cannot control which pin you’ll receive with your order, if you order using your Adafruit account we’ll send you a pin you haven’t gotten yet. Once you collect them all, we might have to send you repeats. Each pin is limited edition – so once we’ve given them all away, we won’t have any more. Act fast to collect them all!

ONE FREE ADAFRUIT FEATHER 32U4 BASIC PRO for orders $150 or more. Some restrictions apply and while supplies last!

FREE UPS ground (Continental USA) for orders $200 or more. Some restrictions apply.

Some restrictions apply


Adafruit Holiday Shipping Deadlines 2016

Here are your 2016 shipping deadlines for ordering from Adafruit. Please review our shipping section if you have specific questions on how and where we ship worldwide for this holiday season.

The Adafruit Shipping Department works hard to get your orders out as quickly as we can, but once they’re in the hands of our carriers they’re out of our control.

Carriers have been struggling to keep up with the sharp rise in online orders. UPS, FedEX, and USPS all experienced delivery delays over the last few years.

So all the Adafruit Shippers say: Please be sure you get your gifts early! Order as soon as you can! Once you place your order we’ll ship like the wind!

Please note: We do not offer Saturday or Sunday service for UPS or USPS.

Sunday, Dec. 25, 2016, Christmas, no UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Dec. 26, 2016, no UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

Monday, Jan. 2, 2017, no UPS or USPS pickup or delivery service.

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Gift Certificates are always available at any time.

When in doubt contact us!

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UPS ground: Place orders by Friday 11am ET – December 9, 2016 – There is no guarantee that UPS Ground packages will arrive by December 23.

UPS 3-day: Place orders by Thursday 11am ET – December 15, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016.

UPS 2-day: Place orders by Friday 11am ET – December 16, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016.

UPS overnight: Place orders by Monday 11am ET – December 19, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016.

United States Postal Service, First Class and Priority: Place orders by Friday– December 9, 2016 – Arrive by 12/23/2016 or sooner.

International Orders

USPS First class mail international: Place orders by Friday – November 18, 2016. Can take up to 30 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/23/2016 or sooner, but not a trackable service and cannot be guaranteed to arrive by 12/23/2016.

USPS Express mail international: Place orders by Friday – December 2, 2016. Can take up to 15 days or more with worldwide delays and customs. Should arrive by 12/23/2016 or sooner.

UPS WORLDWIDE EXPRESS, UPS WORLDWIDE EXPEDITED and UPS EXPRESS SAVER (UPS International orders): Place orders by Friday 11am ET – December 9, 2016 – There is no guarantee that international packages will arrive by December 23 2016.

by nicknormal at December 08, 2016 05:30 AM

November 07, 2016

adafruit industries blog

‘Zooids’ are Open-Source, Open-Hardware ‘Bots for ‘Swarm User Interfaces’

I admit, they’re cute. But I can’t help but think this is the beginning of the creation of those swarm bots that derail the path of Destiny in Stargate: Universe; I’m strictly talking in parallel-universe dimensionality of course, because we all know those drone-bots are not currently anywhere near our solar system – let’s keep it that way okay!

This paper introduces swarm user interfaces, a new class of human-computer interfaces comprised of many autonomous robots that handle both display and interaction. We describe the design of Zooids, an open-source open-hardware platform for developing tabletop swarm interfaces. The platform consists of a collection of custom-designed wheeled micro robots each 2.6 cm in diameter, a radio base-station, a high-speed DLP structured light projector for optical tracking, and a software framework for application development and control. We illustrate the potential of tabletop swarm user interfaces through a set of application scenarios developed with Zooids, and discuss general design considerations unique to swarm user interfaces.

by nicknormal at November 07, 2016 04:29 PM

October 28, 2016

adafruit industries blog

Father Turns Son into a Transforming Optimus Prime

It’s apparently the year for especially fantastic homemade Halloween costumes. We’ve seen one parent craft a cute and furry tauntaun costume for their toddler, and now Redditor Renz2LK has made an Optimus Prime costume for his son. It’s not just any Optimus Prime cosplay — it actually transforms. I’m mesmerized by the above video.

Renz2LK spend about six hours over two days crafting the Optimus Prime costume. He used scrap EVA foam from his workshop to build the vehicle shell. He painted it using spray paint and added acrylics for weathering. Regarding using EVA foam, he said:

As for my son’s costume, it was basic geometric shapes, so it was pretty easy to just custom size each piece to fit him. As for the transforming part, I had seen him pretending to transform while playing in costume. I just created the cab portion of the truck to cover him and found that it was easy to flip it open when he stood up.

And another look at the transforming action:

via Reddit

by Amy Ratcliffe at October 28, 2016 01:00 PM

October 04, 2016

adafruit industries blog

‘The Jolly Julep,’ Handmade and Hand-Powered Paddle Boat #WMF16

‘The Jolly Julep’ was a fun handmade paddle boat designed by The Fulton Mules, on display at World Maker Faire this past weekend. It uses a simple slide mechanism to translate human push-power into spinning paddle speed (see video below!). And as things go in NYC you can’t exactly park this in your apartment (some apartments are smaller than this boat!), so the whole thing was designed to quickly break down and re-assemble; the team built it the day before in a few hours (in the rain no less!). The boat was a recent participant at the Battle for Mau Mau Island, itself a project of some of the Swimming Cities crew, who I wrangled many years ago to display their fish-boat at the inaugural 2010 World Maker Faire – so it was good to see boat culture alive and well at a Maker Faire!

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The wooden fin-waves on the side were a nice touch!

img_20161001_151247

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Watch it in action – play the video below! (Now of course air is a lot less resistant than water, but this shows you how fast this thing can go with human-powered effort!)

by nicknormal at October 04, 2016 07:31 PM